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Birds wade on the banks of the Imjin. Kim Seung-ho tallied 32 species of birds in the CCZ in a single morning. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Korean DMZ, Wildlife Thrives. Some Conservationists Worry Peace Could Disrupt It

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Axel Hirschfeld looks at the remains of dead birds while holding a Levant sparrowhawk. The bird was found locked in a small enclosure without food or water in a field used by poachers in the town of Ras Baalbek, Lebanon, in September. Sam Tarling for NPR hide caption

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Sam Tarling for NPR

George, the last known Achatinella apexfulva, a Hawaiian land snail, died on New Year's Day. David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources hide caption

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David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

Chinese border patrol gunboats come downriver from the Yunnan province about once a month in a show of force to keep the Mekong River safe, as China's Xinhua News Agency puts it. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

China Reshapes The Vital Mekong River To Power Its Expansion

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High-speed tracking dogs have been a game-changer in the fight against rhino poaching in South Africa. Their success depends on their ability to work as a team, which means they sleep and eat in the pack-sized enclosures shown above. David Fuchs hide caption

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David Fuchs

To Combat Rhino Poaching, Dogs Are Giving South African Park Rangers A Crucial Assist

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A southern white rhino named Victoria is two months pregnant. Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, announced the news on Thursday. Julie Watson/AP hide caption

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Julie Watson/AP

A gray wolf in Jamtland County, Sweden. A wealthy landowner in Scotland is hoping to bring wolves from Sweden to the Scottish Highlands to thin the herd of red deer. Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out

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Pro-public lands messages are projected on the McNichols Civic Center in Denver. The Outdoor Retailer and Snow Show moved to Colorado because of a public land use dispute with Utah government leaders. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

Rodney Stotts walks across the roof of the Matthew Henson Earth Conservation Center with one of his hawks. A former drug dealer, he is now a falconer — one of only 30 African-American falconers in the U.S., he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

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Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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