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Sebastiano Ridolfi tries on the costume of Papà del Gnoco, or "Gnocchi Dad," the Santa-esque figure who's the symbol of the gnocchi-themed pre-Lent celebration in Verona, Italy. Although Ridolfi didn't win the election to be Papà del Gnoco, he was received warmly by the crowd and remains committed to challenging traditions. Andrea Di Martino hide caption

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Andrea Di Martino

A satire of women's social discourse in the Queen Anne period depicts six women taking tea in a parlor, with figures on the left signifying hidden emotions and power struggles behind a genteel facade. Circa 1710. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

At Colonial Williamsburg's garden and nursery, which is open to guests, staff grow items that would have been found in gentry pleasure gardens: herbs, flowers and seasonal greens. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation hide caption

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Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Sriraja Panich is the brand name of one of two Sriracha sauces created by Saowanit Trikityanukul's family. The family sold the brand to Thaitheparos, Thailand's leading sauce company, in the 1980s. The brand has struggled to gain a foothold in the U.S., where the Huy Fong Rooster brand of Sriracha, created by Vietnamese-American David Tran, reigns supreme. Michael Sullivan/for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/for NPR

In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About

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Sorrel, a festive drink made by steeping hibiscus flowers, is the taste of the holidays throughout the Caribbean. It is also a close cousin to the African-American red drink, described as "liquid soul." Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR

Rosogolla, also known as rasgulla, is a simple white spongy ball, made of chhena, an Indian version of cottage cheese, dunked in syrup. Above, newer, colorful iterations of this classic sweet are for sale during Rosogolla Day in Kolkata, India. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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Sandip Roy for NPR

The Oscar For Best Snack Goes To ... Popcorn, The 6,000-Year-Old Aztec Gold

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Panda Express came up with the recipe for Orange Chicken 30 years ago today. It's the company's signature dish and top seller. Nina Gregory /NPR hide caption

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Nina Gregory /NPR

Orange Chicken, Panda Express' Gift To American Chinese Food, Turns 30

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In the last 13 years of Queen Victoria's life, she spent a great deal of time with Abdul Karim, who came from India initially to wait on the queen's table, but soon became part of her inner circle. And despite all opposition, Victoria and Karim curried on. Alexander Bassano/Spencer Arnold/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Bassano/Spencer Arnold/Getty Images

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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At the turn of the 20th century, when access to professional care was spotty, many cookbooks served up recipes for the sick — some (brandy) more appealing than others (toast water). Even the Joy Of Cooking included sickbed recipes up through the 1943 edition. George Marks/Getty Images hide caption

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George Marks/Getty Images

This upland rice is a remarkable link between West Africa, the Gullah-Geechee sea islands of the American South, and the Merikin settlements of southern Trinidad. Courtesy of Francis Morean hide caption

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Courtesy of Francis Morean

Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

American servicemen enjoy a hot cup of coffee at a Salvation Army hut in New York, circa 1918. During World War I, instant coffee was a key provision for soldiers on the front. They called it a "cup of George." FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Anyone who has read or seen Victor Hugo's masterpiece knows the plot of Les Miserables turns on the theft of a simple loaf of bread. There was no sharper barometer of economic status in 19th-century France than bread. Minnie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Minnie Phan for NPR

La Belle Limonadiere, hand coloured etching (1816). Lemonade was ubiquitous in mid-17th century Paris. Where the limonadiers went, piles of spent lemon peels followed. As rats nibbled on the peels, they killed off plague-infected fleas, Tom Nealon argues in his new book. Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press hide caption

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Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press

From happy Neolithic-era accident to inspiration for student protests to tabletop staple, butter has had quite the ride over the past 10,000 years. A new book tells the story. Lew Rovertson/Getty Images/StockFood hide caption

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Lew Rovertson/Getty Images/StockFood