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Facebook says 30 million users were affected by a recent security breach, including 400,000 whose accounts were nearly fully accessed and another 14 million who had broad categories of personal data stolen. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

"To an extraordinary degree, Mark Zuckerberg is Facebook ... so if you're going to understand Facebook in any meaningful way, the conversation really has to start with him and end with him," journalist Evan Osnos says. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Central Question Behind Facebook: 'What Does Mark Zuckerberg Believe In?'

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Facebook does not yet know who carried out the attacks or where they were based. The company knows the attackers attempted to access profile information but not whether they succeeded. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

A new lawsuit alleges Facebook is misleading advertisers, but the company says it can't guarantee that all ads will reach their intended targets. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Does Facebook Really Work? People Question Effectiveness Of Ads

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Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Officer Jack Dorsey testify during a Senate intelligence committee hearing on Sept. 5. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Facebook Shuts 652 Iran-Backed Accounts Linked In Global Disinformation Campaign

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People walk into the cafeteria at Facebook's main campus in Menlo Park, Calif., May 15, 2012. ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

For Some Facebook Employees, Free Food Is Coming To An End

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Alex Jones, shown here at a July 2016 rally in support of then-candidate Donald Trump, says he is being subjected to a "purge" from big tech companies. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Alex Jones and his Infowars channels have been removed from YouTube; Facebook and Apple's iTunes have also deleted most or all of his outlets on their services. He's seen here being escorted from a rally near the 2016 Republican National Convention. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Facebook says it is still in early stages of an investigation and is sharing information with U.S. law enforcement and Congress. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

Facebook Says It Removed Pages Involved In Deceptive Political Influence Campaign

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Jes Petersen, CEO of Phandeeyar, a Yangon-based tech hub, speaks to visiting U.S. government officials and civil society activists. Phandeeyar is one of several groups that have pressed Facebook to moderate its Burmese-language content to prevent hate speech. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is pictured at F8, Facebook's developer conference last month. On Thursday, the company announced a new test feature had changed users' privacy settings without their consent. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Facebook says it disagrees with how The New York Times is presenting data-sharing deals it has used for at least 10 years. Here, a man reads security parameters on his phone in front of a Facebook logo in Bordeaux, southwestern France. Regis Duvignau/Reuters hide caption

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Regis Duvignau/Reuters

Lola Omolola is the founder of FIN, a private Facebook group with nearly 1.7 million members that has become a support network for women around the globe. Nolis Anderson for NPR hide caption

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Nolis Anderson for NPR

One Woman's Facebook Success Story: A Support Group For 1.7 Million

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Paul Smith says he wanted "take a page from the Russian playbook" to influence a California congressional campaign. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR

Inspired By Russia, He Bought Influence On Facebook

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