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Facebook says it disagrees with how The New York Times is presenting data-sharing deals it has used for at least 10 years. Here, a man reads security parameters on his phone in front of a Facebook logo in Bordeaux, southwestern France. Regis Duvignau/Reuters hide caption

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Regis Duvignau/Reuters

Lola Omolola is the founder of FIN, a private Facebook group with nearly 1.7 million members that has become a support network for women around the globe. Nolis Anderson for NPR hide caption

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Nolis Anderson for NPR

One Woman's Facebook Success Story: A Support Group For 1.7 Million

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Paul Smith says he wanted "take a page from the Russian playbook" to influence a California congressional campaign. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR

Inspired By Russia, He Bought Influence On Facebook

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Johanna Humphrey, left, ended up with 24 boxes of crayons she didn't need. She gave them to teacher Laura Smith, right, through the Buy Nothing Project. It encourages people to share without money changing hands. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

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A protester holds a European Union flag next to cardboard cutouts depicting Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, as Zuckerberg and leaders of the European Parliament prepare to meet in Brussels. Francois Lenoir/Reuters hide caption

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Francois Lenoir/Reuters

Facebook said its new dating feature will use profile information to help match users. Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

It's A Date: Facebook Enters Online Matchmaking

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As some Facebook users talk about leaving the platform, ideas for a different type of social network are beginning to emerge. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

As Facebook Shows Its Flaws, What Might A Better Social Network Look Like?

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Call center employees work for the Facebook Community Operations Team in Essen, Germany, on Nov. 23. The workers review Facebook content and delete it if it fails to meet the company's standards. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Facebook Updates Community Standards, Expands Appeals Process

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Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, special counsel on the Russia investigation, leaves following a meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee in June 2017. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

"Facebook is looking to know basically as much as possible about its users," Julia Angwin says. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook And Other Firms Have A Ton Of Data On You. Here's How To Limit That

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After Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg spoke to Congress about a massive data breach, the company announced it would no longer fund an effort to oppose The Consumer Right to Privacy Act. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Media Or Tech Company? Facebook's Profile Is Blurry

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A laptop showing the Facebook logo is held alongside a Cambridge Analytica sign at the entrance to the London offices of Cambridge Analytica. The company's acting CEO, Alexander Tayler, is stepping down, and is the second CEO out since the data sharing scandal broke. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

This week, Facebook began notifying people whether they had ever logged in to the "This Is Your Digital Life" app — which has been linked to the exposure of tens of millions of records for political research. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images