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Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at a trade fair in 2018. The company says it will use artificial intelligence to figure out which of its users have died. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at the company's annual developers conference in San Jose, Calif., May 1, 2018. Facebook is beginning to enforce a ban on white nationalist content. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

With Facebook Ban On White Extremism, International Norms Apply To U.S.

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An increasing body of research has documented the addictive nature of social media. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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In An Increasingly Polarized America, Is It Possible To Be Civil On Social Media?

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"Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are and where they live," Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said in a statement. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Housing Department Slaps Facebook With Discrimination Charge

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Facebook announced Wednesday that it will ban white nationalism and separatism content starting next week. "It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," it said. Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images

Evaldas Rimasauskas pleaded guilty to wire fraud charges on Wednesday for his part in orchestrating a scheme to swindle Google and Facebook out of more than $100 million. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

A police officer directs pedestrians near the site of one of the mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Saturday, March 16. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

Social Media Companies Struggle To Pull Livestreamed Video Of Mass Shootings

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After years of light regulation, the tech industry is coming under scrutiny from Congress and regulators due to a series of privacy breaches. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Targeting Online Privacy, Congress Sets A New Tone With Big Tech

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After widespread pressure to repudiate anti-vaccine misinformation on the social media platform, Facebook announced on Thursday that it's taking several steps to tackle the issue. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on May 1, 2018, in San Jose, Calif. He is pledging more enhanced privacy and other features when it comes to private messages. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Advocacy groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission to open an investigation into Facebook practices that let children make in-game purchases without their parents' permission. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Senate committees in April. But he hasn't appeared before British Parliament, despite its requests for him to do so. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Gizmodo's Kashmir Hill tried to disconnect from all Amazon products, including smart speakers, as part of a bigger experiment in living without the major tech players. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

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Andreas Mundt, president of Germany's Federal Cartel Office, says "Facebook obtains very detailed profiles of its users and knows what they are doing online" by merging data from a number of sources. Mundt announced the antitrust watchdog's findings in Bonn, Germany, on Thursday. Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters hide caption

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Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters

Facebook has been paying young users as young as 13 years old up to $20 a month to install an app called Facebook Research, TechCrunch reported. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Google Draw Scrutiny Over Apps That Collected Data From Teens

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