earthquake in Turkey and Syria earthquake in Turkey and Syria
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earthquake in Turkey and Syria

A view inside what was the dome of the historic Habib-i Najjar Mosque in Antakya. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Turkey's Antakya is in ruins after the quake, erasing cultural and religious heritage

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Employees box up baklava for customers at Imam Cagdas in Gaziantep, Turkey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Baklava took a break in Turkey's pastry capital after the earthquake. Now it's back

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Two boys walk through a small tent encampment in Gaziantep, Turkey, on Thursday, Feb. 16. People have set up makeshift tents since they are too afraid to return to their homes after the earthquake. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Tent camps are everywhere now in Turkey's earthquake zone. Here's one

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Ali Kafadenk, 34, poses in front of the rubble of his destroyed apartment in Islahiye, Turkey. He and his wife Merve, 27, survived the earthquake that struck Turkey and Syria on Feb 6. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

One couple's bedroom caved in during the earthquake. Here's how it saved their lives

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Trucks in an aid convoy cross from Turkey into rebel-held northern Syria through the Bab al-Salama crossing on Feb. 14, after it reopened for U.N. relief. Bakr Alkasem/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bakr Alkasem/AFP via Getty Images

Aid groups help Turkey-Syria quake survivors amid global crises and donor fatigue

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Yasin Pinarbasi walks into a building he inspected that suffered some earthquake damage, west of Antakya, Turkey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Is it safe to go home? With hard hats and phone apps, Turkey's engineers seek answers

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Residents remove their belongings from their destroyed house in Samandag, in southern Turkey, on Thursday. The number of people killed in the Feb. 6 earthquakes that devastated parts of southern Turkey and northern Syria continues to rise. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Members of a search and rescue operation work Sunday on an area that collapsed during the earthquake in Antakya, in southeastern Turkey. Disaster recovery experts say ordinary people are crucial to saving lives. Bernat Armangue/AP hide caption

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Bernat Armangue/AP

A funeral ceremony is performed at a mass grave site in Kahramanmaras, Turkey, where thousands of bodies from the earthquake are already buried and more graves are still being dug. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Turkey buries its earthquake dead in small cemeteries and mass graves

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Medine Sonmez (right) has been emotional in the days since the earthquake. "I am gone," she says. "My body is here but I am gone." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visits the city center destroyed by last the Feb. 6 earthquake in Kahramanmaras, southern Turkey, on Feb. 8. Turkish Presidency via AP hide caption

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Turkish Presidency via AP

Women sit in front of the rubble of an area destroyed during the earthquake in Antakya, southeastern Turkey, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2023. Bernat Armangue/AP hide caption

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Bernat Armangue/AP

Turkish rescue workers carry Ergin Guzeloglan, 36, to an ambulance on Saturday after pulling him out of a collapsed building in Hatay, southern Turkey, five days after an earthquake devastated the region. Can Ozer/AP hide caption

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Can Ozer/AP

People walk past collapsed buildings on Thursday in the town of Jinderis, in Syria's Aleppo province, days after a massive earthquake devastated the region. Ghaith Alsayed/AP hide caption

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Ghaith Alsayed/AP

Northern Syria, already ravaged by war, is desperate for aid after the earthquake

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A woman sits on the rubble as emergency rescue teams search for people under the remains of destroyed buildings in the town of Nurdagi on the outskirts of Osmaniye in southern Turkey on Tuesday. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Khalil Hamra/AP

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan tours the site of destroyed buildings during his visit to the city of Kahramanmaras, in southeast Turkey, on Wednesday, two days after the severe earthquake that hit the region. Adem Altan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Adem Altan/AFP via Getty Images

As the earthquake death toll soars, so does criticism of Turkey's government response

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Assalah Shikhani with her daughters Lilian and Susan on Antakya Mountain on August 21, 2022. Assalah Shikhani hide caption

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Assalah Shikhani

An update from a Syrian teacher who lost her home and loved ones in the earthquakes

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