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SweetHearts will be tougher to find this Valentine's Day. The company that used to make the popular candy went out of business. Its new owners aren't ready to start making new batches yet. Chitose Suzuki/AP hide caption

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Chitose Suzuki/AP

Be Mine? Nope. SweetHeart Candies Hard To Find This Valentine's Day

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Workers sort NECCO Wafers at the New England Confectionery Co. in Revere, Mass. The Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company made the winning bid for NECCO, which filed for bankruptcy in early April. Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rumors of the NECCO maker's impending demise have sparked a renewed interest in its products — especially its famous chalky-tasting wafers that some people love to hate. Dina Rudick/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Dina Rudick/Boston Globe via Getty Images

NECCO-Mania: Fans Stock Up On Chalky Wafers In Case Candy Company Folds

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NPR intern Kevin Garcia endures the sour taste of Warheads hard candy. Why are we tempted by candy that pretends to be made of hazardous chemicals, that threatens to nuke our taste buds, or that dares us to be disgusted? Photo illustration by Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Josh Loock/NPR

The Eugene J. Candy Co., which opened a year ago in Brooklyn, stocks offbeat novelties like wax fangs as well as its own experimental confections. Courtesy of Eugene J. hide caption

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Courtesy of Eugene J.

Willy Wonka-Inspired 'Candy Alchemist' Spins Sugar Into Pure Imagination

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Liberty Orchards in Cashmere, Wash., which was founded by two Armenian immigrants, still makes Aplets & Cotlets, a variation of Turkish delight that includes apples, apricots and walnuts. Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc.

The scariest part of the holiday comes in the days that follow, as parents fight and negotiate to limit how much candy their kids eat. NPR's Gisele Grayson decided to pay her kids off to give up their loot. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients. Courtesy of Curtis Chan hide caption

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Courtesy of Curtis Chan

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

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