opiods opiods

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

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On Jan. 10, President Trump signed into law the bipartisan Interdict Act, to give federal agents more tools to curtail opioid trafficking. But, after declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency last fall, Trump has been slow to request money for treatment, critics note. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

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Earl Borges, now 70, conducted river patrols in the Navy during the Vietnam War. These days, he says, symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ALS can intensify the anxiety he experiences as a result of PTSD. Courtesy of Shirley Borges hide caption

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Courtesy of Shirley Borges

Reverberations Of War Complicate Vietnam Veterans' End-Of-Life Care

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Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain

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Despite increased access to overdose rescue kits containing opioid antidotes like naloxone, Pittsburgh paramedic James Dlutowski says the government should focus efforts on funding for addiction treatment. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen /NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen /NPR

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

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Got Back Pain? Try Yoga Or Massage Before Reaching For The Pills

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Debbie Deagle holds a photo of her son Stephen and herself. Martha Bebinger/WBUR hide caption

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Martha Bebinger/WBUR

Organ Donations Spike In The Wake Of The Opioid Epidemic

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The State Crime Lab at the Ohio Attorney General's headquarters of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation displayed a variety of different types of heroin. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Remembering A Few Of The People Behind Overdose Numbers In Ohio

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Dr. Alexis LaPietra (left) and Dr. Mark Rosenberg have developed a program that tries to treat emergency room patients' pain without using opioids, which pose fatal risks. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

No Joke: N.J. Hospital Uses Laughing Gas To Cut Down On Opioid Use

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Dr. Jessie Gaeta, chief medical officer of Health Care for the Homeless at Boston Medical Center, stands in a conference room that will soon be converted to a place where patients high on heroin or other drugs can be safely monitored. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Boston's Heroin Users Will Soon Get A Safer Place To Be High

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"The people that I know who have lost spouses, children, some of them are so ashamed that they wouldn't even acknowledge it as a cause of death," says A. Thomas McLellan, co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute. Courtesy of Treatment Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Treatment Research Institute

Treating Addiction As A Chronic Disease

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Anatomy Of Addiction: How Heroin And Opioids Hijack The Brain

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Sales of prescription opioid painkillers have quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Maine Bill Aims To Make Abuse-Deterrent Painkillers More Affordable

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Number of providers by state who wrote at least 3,000 prescriptions for Schedule 2 controlled substances in 2012 in Medicare Part D. ProPublica/NPR hide caption

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Prolific Prescribers Of Controlled Substances Face Medicare Scrutiny

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