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A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

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U.S. Attorney William McSwain and colleagues announced a civil lawsuit Wednesday in Philadelphia against the nonprofit Safehouse. "We have a responsibility to step in," McSwain says, though he adds, "We're not bringing a criminal case right now." Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Combining some common antidepressants and opioids can undercut the relief of the painkillers. Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images

Families that lost loved ones to the opioid crisis protested outside Suffolk Superior Court in Boston as lawyers for Purdue Pharma entered the courthouse for a status update in the Massachusetts attorney general's suit against the company on Jan. 25. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The drugs clonazepam and diazepam are both benzodiazepines; they're better known by the brand names Klonopin and Valium. The drug class also includes Ativan, Librium and Halcion. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Getty Images

When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

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A filing by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey detailed the Sackler family's role in Purdue Pharma's marketing of OxyContin. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

The 2016 viral photo of a couple passed out in a car while a child sits in the back seat triggered a painful moment of self-reflection in East Liverpool, Ohio. The community took steps to address its addiction problem, but progress has been spotty. Ian Brown for NPR hide caption

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Ian Brown for NPR

A view inside Rhode Island's John J. Moran Medium Security Prison, in Cranston. Rhode Island is the only state to screen every individual who comes into the correctional system for opioid use disorder, and to offer, in conjunction with with counseling, all three medically effective treatments. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Rhode Island Prisons Push To Get Inmates The Best Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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A drug specialist in the Mexican army shows crystal methamphetamine paste seized at a clandestine laboratory in Mexico's Baja California in August. Much of the meth sold in the U.S. today comes from Mexico, according to DEA officials. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

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Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Alice Goldfarb/NPR hide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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Ed Rendell, former governor of Pennsylvania, has taken a strong stand on supervised injection sites. Andrew Harrer/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Getty Images

'Come And Arrest Me': Former Pa. Governor Defies Justice Department On Safe Injection

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Suboxone, a medicine to treat opioid addiction, helps people struggling with substance abuse by blocking their cravings and physical withdrawal symptoms. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Addiction Treatment Gap Is Driving A Black Market For Suboxone

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Purdue Pharma, maker of the opioid OxyContin, has a subsidiary that won a patent for a treatment for opioid addiction. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Despite abuse deterrent formulation, Purdue Pharma's OxyContin continues to be used by some people with opioid addiction to get high. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Insurer To Purdue Pharma: We Won't Pay For OxyContin Anymore

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Janjic found that playing the piano didn't make her pain go away completely, but it eased the pain she felt. Jeff Swensen for NPR hide caption

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Jeff Swensen for NPR

Inspired By Her Own Pain, A Researcher Explores Alternatives To Opioid Treatments

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These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source

A police officer speaks to a man on New Haven Green, where more than 70 people fell ill from suspected drug overdoses on Wednesday in New Haven, Conn. Bill Sikes/AP hide caption

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Bill Sikes/AP

Bea and Doug Duncan outside their home in Natick, Mass. The coaching they got from the Community Reinforcement and Family Training program, they say, gave them tools to help their son Jeff stick to his recovery from drug use. He's 28 now and has been sober for nine years. Robin Lubbbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbbock/WBUR

A homeless man in Denver draws heroin into a syringe. Treatment centers in the city say patterns of drug use seem to be changing. While most users once relied on a single drug — typically painkillers or heroin or cocaine — an increasing number now also use meth. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

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A drug user prepares a hit of heroin inside VANDU's supervised injection room. Rafal Gerszak for NPR hide caption

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Rafal Gerszak for NPR

Watchful Eyes: At Peer-Run Injection Sites, Drug Users Help Each Other Stay Safe

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