opioids opioids

At safe injection sites like Insite, in Vancouver, Canada, drug users can inject drugs under the watch of trained medical staff who will help in case of overdose. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Cities Planning Supervised Drug Injection Sites Fear Justice Department Reaction

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Shannon Hubbard has complex regional pain syndrome and considers herself lucky that her doctor hasn't cut back her pain prescription dosage. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Patients With Chronic Pain Feel Caught In An Opioid Prescribing Debate

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Any amount of opioid use was associated with a higher risk of arrest, parole or probation according to a new study. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images

Main Street in McArthur in Vinton County, Ohio. Though the opioid crisis endures in Ohio, the problem is now compounded by the resurgence of methamphetamine addiction. Arezou Rezvani/NPR hide caption

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Arezou Rezvani/NPR

Teachers See the Effects of the Opioid Crisis On Children

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A volunteer cleans up needles used for drug injection that were found at a homeless encampment in Everett, Wash., in November. Respondents in a Federal Reserve survey who knew someone who had been addicted to opioids were less likely to give the economy a favorable rating. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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The Surgeon General recommends more Americans carry naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Reversing An Overdose Isn't Complicated, But Getting The Antidote Can Be

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Katy Sexton was a regular at the Road to Redemption recovery support group meetings in Muncie, Ind. She died on Halloween 2017. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Parents Lose Their Daughter And Their Life Savings To Opioids

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Physical therapist Ingrid Peele coaches Kim Brown through strengthening exercises to help her with her chronic pain, at the OSF Central Illinois Pain Center in Peoria. Kyle Travers/WFYI hide caption

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Kyle Travers/WFYI

Researchers looked at states with medical marijuana dispensaries and those that allow home cultivation. Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Opioid Use Lower In States That Eased Marijuana Laws

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Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

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Renea Molden was able to stop taking opioid painkillers with the help of non-opioid alternatives. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Opioids Don't Beat Other Medications For Chronic Pain

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Colorado State Rep. Brittany Pettersen (right) is advocating for more treatment money for opioid addiction, in part because of the substance abuse struggles of her mother, Stacy (left). Nathaniel Minor/CPR News hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/CPR News

States Seek More Federal Funding For Opioid Treatment, Not More Promises

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