opioids opioids

The revelation that a favorite uncle had died from a long-hidden drug habit shook Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky to his core. Last month Ostrovksy quit his job as Medicaid's chief medical officer and joined a group that's working to dispel the shame of addiction. Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images

MaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from the opioid painkillers she was prescribed for chronic nerve pain. "I felt tired all the time and I was still in pain," she says. Marijuana works better for her, but costs $200 per month out-of-pocket. Emily Corwin/VPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/VPR

The High Cost Of Medical Marijuana Causes Pain In Vermont

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Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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Terry Lilly, then 36, of Charleston, W.Va., almost a year ago when he was first interviewed by NPR's Sarah McCammon. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

After Drug Treatment, Men In Recovery Work To Live A 'Normal Life'

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Lauren Kafka rented a machine that delivered cold water and compression to manage pain after rotator cuff surgery. Her insurance company said it wasn't medically necessary and refused to pay for it. Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Is There A Way To Keep Using Opioid Painkillers And Reduce Risk?

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Billionaire founder of Insys Therapeutics John Kapoor leaves U.S. District Court after being arrested earlier Thursday in Phoenix. Kapoor and other defendants in the fraud and racketeering case are accused of offering bribes to doctors to write large numbers of prescriptions for a fentanyl-based pain medication meant only for cancer patients with severe pain. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Julie Eldred is back at home in Massachusetts now. But she was sentenced to a treatment program for opioid addiction as part of a probation agreement, then sent to jail when she relapsed. Some addiction specialists say that's unjust. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Court To Rule On Whether Relapse By An Addicted Opioid User Should Be A Crime

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Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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Nate Miller is the owner of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency in Muncie, Ind., that screens and places workers at local manufacturing companies. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Opioid Crisis Looms Over Job Market, Worrying Employers And Economists

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The shelter at Houston's Convention Center, seen here Aug. 29, isn't equipped to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid abuse. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Houston Methadone Clinics Reopen After Harvey's Flooding

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We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images