opioids opioids

Addiction counselor John Fisher says prescriptions for medicines to help people wean themselves from opioid drugs are part of the appeal of the clinic he operates in Blountville, Tenn. Blake Farmer/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Blake Farmer/NPR

When Drug Treatment For Narcotic Addiction Never Ends

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455924664/456831563" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gretchen Burns-Bergman (center) speaks Wednesday at a rally in front of the White House about ending mass incarceration of drug users. Angus Chen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Angus Chen/NPR

Listen: on the scene with Moms United by the White House

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456679758/456716682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A young boy talks with Tina Cloer, director of the Children's Bureau, in Indianapolis. The nonprofit shelter takes in children from the state's Department of Child Services when a suitable foster family can't be found. Cloer says the average length of stay at the shelter has increased from two days to 10 in 2015. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Heroin, Opioid Abuse Put Extra Strain On U.S. Foster Care System

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/451991809/452316338" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Boston, Edmund Hassan, a deputy superintendent of emergency medical services, and his colleagues regularly revive people who have overdosed on opioids. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/445399564/446632606" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doris Keene (right) talks with her acupuncturist before a treatment at Portland's Quest Center for Integrative Health. Keene says the treatments have eased her chronic back pain at least as effectively as the Vicodin and muscle relaxants she once relied on. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

To Curb Pain Without Opioids, Oregon Looks To Alternative Treatments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436905063/442441866" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Katie Serio, director of treatment and prevention at the Council on Alcohol and Substance Abuse of Livingston County, N.Y., trains a group of school nurses to use the overdose antidote naloxone at Dansville High School. Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media

School Nurses Stock Drug To Reverse Opioid Overdoses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/440770695/440770696" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Heroin sold in the U.S., like this dose confiscated in Alabama last fall, is often cut with other drugs. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Illicit Version Of Painkiller Fentanyl Makes Heroin Deadlier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434618809/434975526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A user prepares drugs for injection in 2014 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Heroin Use Surges, Especially Among Women And Whites

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/420874860/421083679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Cheyenne, Wyo., emergency room patients who show up more than a few times a month requesting pain pills will now be told no, except in dire emergencies. A similar program at a New Mexico hospital cut ER visits by 5 percent annually, and saved $500,000. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Emergency Rooms Crack Down On Abusers Of Pain Pills

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411560144/411660267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles. Karen Brown/WFCR hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Brown/WFCR

A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401722597/402856156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volunteers search for needles and other drug paraphernalia along Church Street in Austin, Ind., in April. The region has recorded 142 new HIV cases since December, according to the state, in an outbreak tied to injected-opioid use. Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis

CDC Warns More HIV, Hepatitis C Outbreaks Likely Among Drug Users

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401968600/402035073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A kit with naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan, is displayed at the South Jersey AIDS Alliance in Atlantic City. Naloxone counters an overdose with heroin or certain prescription painkillers by blocking the receptors these opioids bind to in the brain. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mel Evans/AP

Needle exchange programs, like this one in Portland, Maine, offer free, sterile syringes and needles to drug users. The programs save money and lives, health officials say, by curtailing the spread of bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis and HIV. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Indiana's HIV Spike Prompts New Calls For Needle Exchanges Statewide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395821345/395966164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript