opioids opioids

Opana ER was reformulated to make it harder to crush and snort, but people abusing the drug turned to injecting it instead. And that fueled an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Dr. Joel Funari performs some 300 tooth extractions annually at his private practice in Devon, Pa.. He's part of a group of dentists reassessing opioid prescribing guidelines in the state. Elana Gordon / WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon / WHYY

Dentists Work To Ease Patients' Pain With Fewer Opioids

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Addiction to opioids and heroin is a major public health problem, but so is alcohol abuse. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Surgeon General Murthy Wants America To Face Up To Addiction

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Public health officials want doctors to consider treating alcohol abuse with medications that have a track record of success. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Health care providers have to have permission from the federal government to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

First responders have found that standard doses of naloxone aren't always enough to counteract the powerful sedating effects of carfentanil. Ted Horowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Horowitz/Getty Images

An Even Deadlier Opioid, Carfentanil, Is Hitting The Streets

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Diazepam, also known as Valium, is used to treat anxiety and insomnia. But when combined with opioids, it can suppress breathing and cause death. Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group/Getty Images
TS Photography/Getty Images

Scientists Engineer An Opioid That May Reduce Pain With Less Risk

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Hearing Officer Jim Teal presides over a session of Early Intervention Family Drug Court in Sacramento, Calif., in March. The county program helps keep families together — and saves taxpayers $7 million annually, Sacramento County officials say. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

California Court Helps Kids By Healing Parents' Addictions

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