opioids opioids

Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590923149/591266978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Renea Molden was able to stop taking opioid painkillers with the help of non-opioid alternatives. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Smith/KCUR

Opioids Don't Beat Other Medications For Chronic Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590837914/591266984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Colorado State Rep. Brittany Pettersen (right) is advocating for more treatment money for opioid addiction, in part because of the substance abuse struggles of her mother, Stacy (left). Nathaniel Minor/CPR News hide caption

toggle caption
Nathaniel Minor/CPR News

States Seek More Federal Funding For Opioid Treatment, Not More Promises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589572710/589802271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ashley Copeland (right) talks to her mom Sue Iverson in the Swedish Medical Center emergency department, near Denver. Copeland got a nerve-blocking anesthetic instead of opioids to ease her severe headache. At discharge she was advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, if necessary. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

toggle caption
John Daley / CPR News

These 10 ERs Sharply Reduced Opioid Use And Still Eased Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587666283/590546443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young man uses heroin under a bridge in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, a neighborhood that has become a hub for heroin use. The economic costs of the epidemic are mounting, researchers say, as the U.S. loses more and more workers in their prime. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The revelation that a favorite uncle had died from a long-hidden drug habit shook Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky to his core. Last month Ostrovksy quit his job as Medicaid's chief medical officer and joined a group that's working to dispel the shame of addiction. Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Getty Images

MaryJane Sarvis, an artist in Shaftsbury, Vt., weaned herself from the opioid painkillers she was prescribed for chronic nerve pain. "I felt tired all the time and I was still in pain," she says. Marijuana works better for her, but costs $200 per month out-of-pocket. Emily Corwin/VPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Corwin/VPR

The High Cost Of Medical Marijuana Causes Pain In Vermont

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577411274/577453555" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576757086/576976761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576584541/576858286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Terry Lilly, then 36, of Charleston, W.Va., almost a year ago when he was first interviewed by NPR's Sarah McCammon. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah McCammon/NPR

After Drug Treatment, Men In Recovery Work To Live A 'Normal Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573212960/573628888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lauren Kafka rented a machine that delivered cold water and compression to manage pain after rotator cuff surgery. Her insurance company said it wasn't medically necessary and refused to pay for it. Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Alexander C. Kafka