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Plaques located in the gray matter of the brain are key indicators of Alzheimer's disease. Cecil Fox/Science Source hide caption

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Cecil Fox/Science Source

Scientists Push Plan To Change How Researchers Define Alzheimer's

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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Dr. Lee Goldstein, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, & Biomedical Engineering at Boston University and Newton North High School Football player Alex Riviero speak on the front porch of Dr. Goldstein's home in Newton, Mass. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

When A High School Football Player Meets A Brain Injury Researcher

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A hippocampal neuron seen in culture. Dendrites are green, dendritic spines are red and DNA is blue. Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Source/Getty Images

Sorry, Adults, No New Neurons For Your Aging Brains

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A study in mice suggests that our brains tell us when to start and stop drinking long before our bodies are fully hydrated. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your Body

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Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Eating Leafy Greens Each Day Tied to Sharper Memory, Slower Decline

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I guess it's too late to change my mind. Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images hide caption

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Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images

Why Your Brain Has Trouble Bailing Out Of A Bad Plan

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A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities. D. Roberts/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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D. Roberts/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., sing a duet. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

The Soprano And The Scientist: A Conversation About Music And Medicine

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Sometime between grade school and grad school, the brain's information highways get remapped in a way that dramatically boosts self-control. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

As Brains Mature, More Robust Information Networks Boost Self-Control

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Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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A 'Hot Zone' In The Brain May Reveal When, And Even What, We Dream

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