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Many hospitals haven't fully implemented guidelines put forth in 2010 to minimize errors in the determination of brain death. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

Researchers Find Lapses In Hospitals' Policies For Determining Brain Death

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Age takes a toll on our internal clocks. Universal Stopping Point Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Stopping Point Photography/Getty Images

As Aging Brain's Internal Clock Fades, A New Timekeeper May Kick In

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An image from the Allen Institute's Brain Explorer shows gene expression across the human brain. Courtesy of Allen Institute For Brain Science hide caption

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Courtesy of Allen Institute For Brain Science

A Genetic Map Hints At What Makes A Brain Human

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TongRo Images/Corbis

The Brain's GPS May Also Help Us Map Our Memories

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Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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Takashi Kitamura/MIT

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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Nazmiye Cakir, a 60-year-old "bird whistler," learned the whistled language from her grandparents, and still uses it. "The one thing you don't whistle about is your love talk," she says with a laugh, "because you'll get caught!" Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR

In A Turkish Village, A Conversation With Whistles, Not Words

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No gambling here: When asked to weigh financial choices, teenagers were more likely to make careful choices than were young adults. David Chestnutt/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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David Chestnutt/Ikon Images/Corbis
Drawn Ideas/Ikon Images/Corbis

Treatment From Brain Tissue May Have Spread Alzheimer's Protein

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Can playing the Project Evo game really improve the brain's ability to deal with distractions? Its manufacturer thinks so. Courtesy of Akili hide caption

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Courtesy of Akili

'Play This Video Game And Call Me In The Morning'

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Will Doctors Soon Be Prescribing Video Games For Mental Health?

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A nanosecond pulsed laser beam starts the photoacoustic imaging process. Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis hide caption

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Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

A Scientist Deploys Light And Sound To Reveal The Brain

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In this colorized image of a brain cell from a person with Alzheimer's, the red tangle in the yellow cell body is a toxic tangle of misfolded "tau" proteins, adjacent to the cell's green nucleus. Thomas Deerinck/NCMIR/Science Source hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck/NCMIR/Science Source

Alzheimer's Drugs In The Works Might Treat Other Diseases, Too

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