brain brain

Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

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Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

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Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Ippei Naoi/Getty Images

Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

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When in a playful mood, rats like a gentle tickle as much as the next guy, researchers find. Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science hide caption

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Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science

Sure, keeping a teenager's thoughts corralled may seem like lion taming. But that impulsivity may help them learn, too. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

A molecular biologist is studying how excess sugar might alter brain chemistry, leading to overeating and eventually, obesity. Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images

This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

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A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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