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State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University
Keith Negley for NPR

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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A self-portrait taken by Cajal in his library when he was in his 30s. Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid hide caption

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Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid

Art Exhibition Celebrates Drawings By The Founder Of Modern Neuroscience

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A mouse with predatory brain circuits switched on is much more likely to attack and kill prey like this cricket. Courtesy of Ivan de Araujo/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Ivan de Araujo/Cell Press

Flipping A Switch In The Brain Turns Lab Rodents Into Killer Mice

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Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

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Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

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Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Ippei Naoi/Getty Images

Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

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When in a playful mood, rats like a gentle tickle as much as the next guy, researchers find. Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science hide caption

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Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science