brain brain

Nazmiye Cakir, a 60-year-old "bird whistler," learned the whistled language from her grandparents, and still uses it. "The one thing you don't whistle about is your love talk," she says with a laugh, "because you'll get caught!" Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR

In A Turkish Village, A Conversation With Whistles, Not Words

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No gambling here: When asked to weigh financial choices, teenagers were more likely to make careful choices than were young adults. David Chestnutt/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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David Chestnutt/Ikon Images/Corbis
Drawn Ideas/Ikon Images/Corbis

Treatment From Brain Tissue May Have Spread Alzheimer's Protein

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Can playing the Project Evo game really improve the brain's ability to deal with distractions? Its manufacturer thinks so. Courtesy of Akili hide caption

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Courtesy of Akili

'Play This Video Game And Call Me In The Morning'

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Will Doctors Soon Be Prescribing Video Games For Mental Health?

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A nanosecond pulsed laser beam starts the photoacoustic imaging process. Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis hide caption

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Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

A Scientist Deploys Light And Sound To Reveal The Brain

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In this colorized image of a brain cell from a person with Alzheimer's, the red tangle in the yellow cell body is a toxic tangle of misfolded "tau" proteins, adjacent to the cell's green nucleus. Thomas Deerinck/NCMIR/Science Source hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck/NCMIR/Science Source

Alzheimer's Drugs In The Works Might Treat Other Diseases, Too

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Nurses Katherine Malinak and Amy Young lift Louis DeMattio, a stroke patient, out of his hospital bed using a ceiling-mounted lift at the Cleveland Clinic. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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Dustin Franz for NPR

People With Brain Injuries Heal Faster If They Get Up And Get Moving

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How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

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The Allen Cell Types Database catalogs all sorts of details about each type of brain cell, including its shape and electrical activity. These cells, taken from the visual area of a mouse brain, are colored according to the patterns of electrical activity they produce. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

A Database Of All Things Brainy

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A color-enhanced cerebral MRI showing a glioma tumor. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

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Scott Camazine/Science Source

Thoughts Can Fuel Some Deadly Brain Cancers

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