law enforcement law enforcement

On Nov. 14, 2017, a shooter killed five people and wounded several others in the rural Northern California town of Rancho Tehama. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

California Town Wrestles With Aftermath Of Shooting Rampage

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In an effort to curb gun violence, Seattle police are now following up in person on court orders requiring people to surrender guns. Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

What It Takes To Get Guns Out Of The Wrong Hands

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The 1936 film You Can't Get Away With It about the FBI portrays a typical G-man of the era, complete with machine gun. AP hide caption

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AP

The Massive Case Of Collective Amnesia: The FBI Has Been Political From The Start

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Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas listens earlier this month as an independent report on violence at a white supremacy rally is read at a news conference. Thomas announced his retirement Monday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

White nationalists clash with police as they are forced out of Emancipation Park after the "Unite the Right" rally Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Andrea J. Ritchie is a black lesbian immigrant, police misconduct attorney, and 2014 Senior Soros Justice Fellow. She is currently researcher-in-residence on Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Criminalization at the Barnard Center for Research on Women. W.C. Moss/Beacon Press hide caption

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W.C. Moss/Beacon Press

Ritchie reads from her book

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Alex Wubbels, the nurse who was arrested for refusing to let a police officer draw blood from an unconscious patient, has settled with Salt Lake City and the University of Utah for $500,000. Wubbels is shown here during an interview in September. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York is being blamed by President Trump for promoting a visa program that was used by the alleged driver of the truck in the New York terrorist attack. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas this month was one of the latest incidents to draw listeners to apps allowing the public to listen to police and fire frequencies. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

D.C. Master Patrol Officer Benjamin Fettering shows a body camera worn in place of a normal radio microphone before a news conference in 2014. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Body Cam Study Shows No Effect On Police Use Of Force Or Citizen Complaints

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This is a Nov. 17, 1967 file photo of former president Lyndon B. Johnson. That year a commission Johnson had organized to come up with recommendations for how to win his "war on crime" issued their report. The legacy of some of those recommendations can be seen today. AP hide caption

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AP

Phoenix police officers stand beside a dump truck blocking a road outside the Phoenix Convention Center on Aug. 22. Protests were held against President Trump as he planned to host a rally inside the convention center. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

A frame grab from video taken from a police body camera shows the July 26 arrest of nurse Alex Wubbels at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. The image was provided by Wubbels' attorney, Karra Porter. Salt Lake City Police Department/Courtesy of Karra Porter via AP hide caption

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Salt Lake City Police Department/Courtesy of Karra Porter via AP

A police officer stands near the site where Officer Miosotis Familia was killed. Familia was shot to death early Wednesday, ambushed inside her command post by an ex-convict, authorities said. He was later killed after pulling a gun on police. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Police Fatalities On The Rise

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Protesters march during a May Day demonstration outside of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office on May 1, 2017 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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People gather in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles during rioting following the acquittal of four police officers in the beating of Rodney King in 1992. The neighborhood looks similar today as it did 25 years ago. It's still more than 80 percent Latino, with lots of immigrant families from Mexico and Central America. Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images

As Los Angeles Burned, The Border Patrol Swooped In

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A Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police officer wears a camera during a news conference in 2014. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior

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A driver uses a phone while behind the wheel of a car on April 30, 2016, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Textalyzer' Aims To Curb Distracted Driving, But What About Privacy?

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