law enforcement law enforcement

Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ikon Images/Getty Images

Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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A crib sheet created to aid police-student interactions might be the first of its kind. The sheet was created by Akron, Ohio, high school students with help from the city's police department. M.L. Schultze /WKSU hide caption

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M.L. Schultze /WKSU

For Students In Ohio, A Crib Sheet For Interacting With Police

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Yonkers community activist Hector Santiago demonstrates the "stop-and-shake" with Lt. Pat McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department. The idea, Santiago says, is to get people to introduce themselves to cops on the street. Courtesy of Hector Santiago hide caption

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Courtesy of Hector Santiago

Instead Of Stop-And-Frisk, How About Stop-And-Shake?

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Attorney Scott Rynecki and Kimberly Ballinger, the domestic partner of Akai Gurley, filed a lawsuit seeking $50 million against the city, the NYPD and officers Peter Liang and Shaun Landau. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Grand Jury Awaits Evidence In NYPD Shooting Of Unarmed Black Man

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The Akron Police Department training class works out at Kent State Basic Police Officer Training Academy. Donald Clayton is the only African-American in the class of 20. M.L. Schultze/WKSU hide caption

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M.L. Schultze/WKSU

In Recruitment Effort, Akron Police Seeks To Mirror The Community

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New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton attends a press conference after witnessing police being retrained under new guidelines at the Police Academy on Dec. 4. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NYPD Disciplinary Problems Linked To A 'Failure Of Accountability'

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There's been a sharp decline in the number of arrests and tickets and summonses issued in New York City. Police sometimes use work slowdowns to show dissatisfaction with policies, workloads or contract disputes. Justin Lane/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Justin Lane/EPA/Landov

When Morale Dips, Some Cops Walk The Beat — But Do The Minimum

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A screen shot of Doug Williams from one of his videos on how to beat a polygraph test. Screen shot/Polygraph.com hide caption

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Screen shot/Polygraph.com

Trial Of Polygraph Critic Renews Debate Over Tests' Accuracy

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Police officers check drivers at a sobriety checkpoint in Escondido, Calif. Lenny Ignelzi/AP hide caption

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Lenny Ignelzi/AP

Traffic Stops Persuade People To Avoid Drinking And Driving

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Former Officer: Policing Takes Patience, But Black Suspects Get Little

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Protesters and law enforcement officers face off during a protest outside the Ferguson Police Department in October. Ferguson police statistics show the department arrest blacks at a higher rate than other racial groups — but that disparity is true for police departments across the country. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Racial Disparities In Arrests Are Prevalent, But Cause Isn't Clear

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Mike Myers is the roving village public safety officer serving southwest Alaska villages including Manokotak. Like many officers in rural Alaska, Myers doesn't carry a gun and often doesn't need one. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Officer's Death Raises Safety Concerns For Alaska's Unarmed Law Enforcement

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