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Taser International is now selling police departments the technology to store videos from body cameras. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

As Police Body Cameras Increase, What About All That Video?

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Officers stand watch at the intersection of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue as protesters walk for Freddie Gray in Baltimore in April. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Police Rethink Tactics Amid New Technologies And Social Pressure

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Maria Hamilton (left) marches in Milwaukee with her sons on April 30 in remembrance of her son Dontre, who was shot and killed by a now-former police officer in a park last year. Hamilton founded Mothers for Justice United, which planned a march on Washington on Saturday to protest police violence. Carrie Antlfinger/AP hide caption

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Carrie Antlfinger/AP

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

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Cellphones were used to record a 2012 confrontation between protesters and police in Springfield, Ill. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Civilians Can Record Police Encounters, But When Is It Interference?

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Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

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Alex Matzke for NPR

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

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Task Force Calls For Independent Probes Of Police-Involved Shootings

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Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ikon Images/Getty Images

Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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A crib sheet created to aid police-student interactions might be the first of its kind. The sheet was created by Akron, Ohio, high school students with help from the city's police department. M.L. Schultze /WKSU hide caption

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M.L. Schultze /WKSU

For Students In Ohio, A Crib Sheet For Interacting With Police

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Yonkers community activist Hector Santiago demonstrates the "stop-and-shake" with Lt. Pat McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department. The idea, Santiago says, is to get people to introduce themselves to cops on the street. Courtesy of Hector Santiago hide caption

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Courtesy of Hector Santiago

Instead Of Stop-And-Frisk, How About Stop-And-Shake?

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Attorney Scott Rynecki and Kimberly Ballinger, the domestic partner of Akai Gurley, filed a lawsuit seeking $50 million against the city, the NYPD and officers Peter Liang and Shaun Landau. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Grand Jury Awaits Evidence In NYPD Shooting Of Unarmed Black Man

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The Akron Police Department training class works out at Kent State Basic Police Officer Training Academy. Donald Clayton is the only African-American in the class of 20. M.L. Schultze/WKSU hide caption

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M.L. Schultze/WKSU

In Recruitment Effort, Akron Police Seeks To Mirror The Community

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