law enforcement law enforcement

In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and in solidarity with the family and supporters of Stephon Clark and others killed by police, demonstrators protest and march in the Magnificent Mile shopping district on April 2, 2018 in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago Debates If Civilian Groups Should Oversee Police

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In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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Colorado State Rep. Cole Wist speaks to State Rep. Larry Liston at the Colorado State Capitol on April 25, 2018. Wist, a Republican, is one of the sponsors of a bill that would allow guns to be temporarily taken away from someone who is a significant risk to themselves or to others. AAron Ontiveroz/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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AAron Ontiveroz/Denver Post via Getty Images

Colorado Lawmakers Weigh 'Red Flag Law' As Gun Owners Push Back

Police tape blocks off a Nashville, Tenn., Waffle House restaurant where at least four people died after a gunman opened fire early Sunday. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Waffle House Shooting Underscores How Gun Laws Vary From State To State

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Bystander video captured an incident in which police in Cambridge, Mass., are seen punching a black Harvard student who was naked in the median. Screengrab by NPR/Cambridge Police Department/YouTube hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/Cambridge Police Department/YouTube

Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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On Nov. 14, 2017, a shooter killed five people and wounded several others in the rural Northern California town of Rancho Tehama. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

California Town Wrestles With Aftermath Of Shooting Rampage

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In an effort to curb gun violence, Seattle police are now following up in person on court orders requiring people to surrender guns. Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

What It Takes To Get Guns Out Of The Wrong Hands

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The 1936 film You Can't Get Away With It about the FBI portrays a typical G-man of the era, complete with machine gun. AP hide caption

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AP

The Massive Case Of Collective Amnesia: The FBI Has Been Political From The Start

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Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas listens earlier this month as an independent report on violence at a white supremacy rally is read at a news conference. Thomas announced his retirement Monday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

White nationalists clash with police as they are forced out of Emancipation Park after the "Unite the Right" rally Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images