sustainability sustainability

Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Sturgeon fisherman Bill Ford has filled Ceapa's boat, "Sturgeon Queen," with his morning's catch: a few gillnets full of wild, six- to eight-foot long Atlantic sturgeon from the St. John River. Courtesy of Cornel Ceapa hide caption

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Courtesy of Cornel Ceapa

Boiled octopus, a recipe for "reliably tender, flavorful octopus that can be used as it is, or as a basis for fried or grilled octopus dishes," write Richard Horsey and Tim Wharton in Ugly Food. "Octopus is also totally sustainable, very economical and incredibly versatile — the various methods of preparation and cooking lend it subtly different flavors," says Wharton. Couresty of Tanya Ghosh hide caption

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Couresty of Tanya Ghosh

Pacific white shrimp raised in Eco Shrimp Garden's indoor aqua farm in New York's Hudson Valley, which owner Jean Claude Frajmund describes as a spa for shrimp. They grow for six months before they're ready for harvest. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Rock shrimp from Florida used to be considered too hard-shelled to be worthwhile as commercial seafood. A custom-made machine to crack and split them has made the sweet crustaceans a favorite for Orlando chef Jessica Tantalo, who prepared them as part of Slow Fish 2016 in New Orleans. Eve Troeh for NPR hide caption

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Eve Troeh for NPR

Herring are delicious, with flaky, mild meat and oil that sizzles on their skin when grilled over a flame. Chefs and ocean advocates have been promoting the environmental and health benefits of eating small fish like this. But the case of the San Francisco Bay's herring shows some of the obstacles to spreading that message. Alastair Bland for NPR hide caption

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Alastair Bland for NPR

A fisherman shovels grey sole, a type of flounder, out of the hold of a ship at the Portland Fish Pier in Maine, September 2015. New research finds the ability of fish populations to reproduce and replenish themselves is declining across the globe. The worst news comes from the North Atlantic, where most species are declining. Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Chef Michael Cimarusti, of Los Angeles' Providence restaurant, is pioneering the West Coast incarnation of Dock to Dish, a program that hooks up local fishermen directly with chefs. Courtesy of Providence hide caption

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Courtesy of Providence

LA's Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

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A building called Sustainability Base, at NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., has an energy-efficient design that allows in sunlight. So for most of the year, the interior is illuminated by natural light. Dominic Hart/NASA hide caption

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Dominic Hart/NASA

NASA Uses Lessons From Space To Design An Efficient Building

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A traditional fisherman in La Paz, Mexico, who works with SmartFish brings sustainable seafood to market. SmartFish was one of the competitors in last week's Fish 2.0 competition. Courtesy of Smart Fish hide caption

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Courtesy of Smart Fish

Students sort grapes at the University of California, Davis research winery. The winery is experimenting with various methods to conserve water. The hope is that commercial wineries will follow suit. Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis

The debate about sustainable diets has focused on meat production, which requires lots of land and water to grow grain to feed livestock. It also contributes to methane emissions. But the Cabinet secretaries with final authority say the 2015 dietary guidelines won't include sustainability goals. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

New Dietary Guidelines Will Not Include Sustainability Goal

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A worker at Ford's assembly plant in Wayne, Mich., installs back seats made from soy-based foam in a Ford C-Max. Jason Margolis/NPR hide caption

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Jason Margolis/NPR

Soy Seats In New Cars: Are Companies Doing Enough For Environment?

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