cardiovascular disease cardiovascular disease

Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Loock/NPR

Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564832694/565288760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531749974/547099694" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shelby Knowles/NPR

Drones carrying automated external defibrillators got to the sites of previous cardiac arrest cases faster than ambulances had, according to test runs conducted by Swedish researchers. Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse hide caption

toggle caption
Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse

It's not clear how living in a segregated neighborhood affects blood pressure, but stress is one potential cause, experts say. annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Leaving Segregated Neighborhoods Lowers Blacks' Blood Pressure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527966937/528503007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Using surrogate endpoints can speed up testing of new drugs, but doesn't always find out if they actually help patients. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dr. Harry Selker, a cardiologist, works on collaborations to improve delivery of medical care. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
M. Scott Brauer for NPR

This Doctor Is Trying To Stop Heart Attacks In Their Tracks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495027377/495226542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Andrew Baker/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Are We Reaching The End Of The Trend For Longer, Healthier Lives?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495050891/495143892" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This synthetic stingray is made of gold, silicone and live muscle cells from a rat. Scientists use pulses of light to guide its propulsion. Karaghen Hudson and Michael Rosnach/Science hide caption

toggle caption
Karaghen Hudson and Michael Rosnach/Science

Synthetic Stingray May Lead To A Better Artificial Heart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484950849/485138758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Linda Johns (lower row, center), in the first moments of her heart attack. She's with fellow authors Kristen Kittscher, Kirby Larson, Suzanne Selfors, Sara Nickerson and Jennifer Longo at Queen Anne Book Co. in Seattle. Courtesy of Linda Johns hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Linda Johns

Tracy Solomon Clark didn't realize that the shortness of breath and dizziness she felt at age 44 was actually serious heart disease. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Hidden Heart Disease Is The Top Health Threat For U.S. Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478922975/479995804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476209760/476419534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript