Albert Einstein Albert Einstein

The owner of a Jerusalem auction house holds up a note on happiness written by Albert Einstein in 1922. The note, which Einstein gave to a courier in lieu of a tip, sold for $1.56 million on Tuesday to an anonymous buyer. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

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A jet emanating from galaxy M87 can be seen in this July 6, 2000, photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA hide caption

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J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA

Lasers and mirrors are used to carefully measure shifts in space-time. To avoid contamination, protective clothing must be worn at all times. LIGO Lab/Caltech/MIT hide caption

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LIGO Lab/Caltech/MIT

How To Catch The Biggest Wave In The Universe

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Why We're All Trapped In 3-D

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Albert Einstein once wrote that he was indebted to a favorite uncle for giving him a toy steam engine when he was a boy, launching a lifelong interest in science. AP hide caption

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AP

Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

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An image from a simulation of two black holes merging. Courtesy of SXS Collaboration hide caption

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Courtesy of SXS Collaboration

Einstein, A Hunch And Decades Of Work: How Scientists Found Gravitational Waves

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A Star-Crossed 'Scientific Fact': The Story Of Vulcan, Planet That Never Was

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