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A Haitian woman holds cherries from a coffee tree. Haiti's coffee trade was once a flourishing industry, but it has been crippled by decades of deforestation, political chaos and now, climate change. Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov hide caption

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Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov

Climate Change Has Coffee Growers In Haiti Seeking Higher Ground

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In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front. Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

Elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores. The fermentation happening in their gut as they break down cellulose helps remove the bitterness in the coffee beans. Here, an elephant receives medical treatment from the Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

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A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

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A fully formed coffee berry, left, is shown next to a damaged coffee berry due to drought, at a coffee farm in Santo Antonio do Jardim, Brazil on Feb. 6. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov

Double Trouble For Coffee: Drought And Disease Send Prices Up

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Doug and Barb Garrott assemble a Lido 2 grinder at their home in Troy, Idaho. They've spent the past three years perfecting their design for the hand-cranked machine. Jessica Greene hide caption

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Jessica Greene

A barista makes coffee using the pour-over method at Artifact Coffee in Baltimore. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Morris/NPR

Coffee can help cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes, fresh research shows. Other foods, such as oranges, lemons and other citrus fruits, nuts and beans can also help. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Briggo's Coffee Haus takes up about 50 square feet of space, has a nice exterior wood design, and accepts orders either on-site or via a website. Courtesy Briggo hide caption

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Courtesy Briggo

A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images