coffee coffee
Stories About

coffee

Jarret Stopforth, a food scientist and one of the founders of Atomo, reengineered the compounds in regular coffee with his partner until he felt they had created a product that had the same color, aroma, flavor and mouthfeel. Courtesy of Atomo hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Atomo

People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

At Shiru Cafe in Providence, R.I., students "pay" for coffee, but not with money. Chaiel Schaffel /Rhode Island Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Chaiel Schaffel /Rhode Island Public Radio

A new report suggests that when consumers buy sustainably-certified coffee, they have little way of knowing whether or how their purchase helps growers. MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration says that a large body of research "does not support a cancer warning for coffee," a statement at odds with a California court ruling earlier this year. Daniel Augusto/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Augusto/Flickr

The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

toggle caption
Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/625128383/625406761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fresh and dried yeast. It might not look like much, but it has shaped the way we eat and live, according to a new book. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

At Mr. John Chivery's Tea-table. An illustration from Charles Dickens' Little Dorrit, originally published in serial form between 1855 and 1857. Universal History Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Universal History Archive/Getty Images

A traditional pot of Yemeni coffee, mixed with cardamom and ginger, is served with a Yemeni sweet honey bread at a new Yemeni coffee shop in Dearborn, Mich. Owner Ibrahim Alhasbani sees himself as part entrepreneur, part cultural ambassador for his home country. Zahir Janmohamed hide caption

toggle caption
Zahir Janmohamed

Rebecca Atienza and her father, Roberto, stand in a grove of decimated coffee trees. Hurricane winds stripped these trees nearly bare of leaves and beans. Nick Michael/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Michael/NPR

'This Was A Beautiful Place': Puerto Rico's Coffee Farms Devastated By Maria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556657967/556962463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A barista at El Injerto coffee shop in Guatemala City pours water into a chemex. Guatemala has long been known for its coffee, but a culture of artisanal coffee has only recently taken root here. Anna-Catherine Brigida hide caption

toggle caption
Anna-Catherine Brigida

A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont

An empty coffee mug, left forlorn on the table. Federal regulators found that "New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee" had an ingredient similar to the active ingredient in Viagra. Ezra Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ezra Bailey/Getty Images