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restaurant workers

The law would allow waitstaff tips to be shared with cooks and other back-of-the-house restaurant workers but prevents owners from getting a cut. Peter Muller/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Muller/Getty Images

Chef Gilbert Brenot teaches trainees at Edwins about meat preparation. The fine-dining restaurant in Cleveland provides education, housing and steady employment for former inmates and is the subject of an Oscar-nominated documentary. TFL Films LLC hide caption

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TFL Films LLC

The Trump administration has proposed a new rule that would give owners of restaurants and other service businesses more control over workers' tips. Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images

Rule Change Could Give Restaurants More Control Over Workers' Tips

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A receipt from Centre Street Cafe in Jamaica Plain, Mass., includes a 3 percent "hospitality administration fee," which comes out to 39 cents on $13 of food sales. The entire fee goes to nontipped employees in the kitchen. Simón Rios/WBUR hide caption

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Simón Rios/WBUR

Restaurants Cook Up A New Way To Pay Kitchen Staff More: A Cut Of Sales

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A new report highlights victims of human trafficking in the food industry, from farm workers to restaurant bus staff, cooks and wait staff. Some victims are exploited for both sex and labor. Juanmonino/Getty Images hide caption

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Juanmonino/Getty Images

At Everyman Espresso in New York City's East Village, customers were greeted with a sign announcing a fundraiser to help defend immigrants. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Amid Travel Ban Debate, Chefs And Food Brands Take A Stand On Immigration

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Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

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The writer, Rachael Cusick, is pictured with chef Oneil Wilson, her co-worker in the kitchen during a summer job as a line cook, during the breakfast shift. Courtesy of Rachael Cusick hide caption

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Courtesy of Rachael Cusick

At fine-dining places, white workers overwhelmingly fill jobs with the heftiest salaries, while Latinos, blacks and other minorities have jobs with pay closer to the poverty level, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Fast-food workers in Los Angeles march in August 2013 to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Similar protests around the country have been organized by labor unions. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Unions Have Pushed The $15 Minimum Wage, But Few Members Will Benefit

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Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

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