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A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

Composting food scraps is one way to reduce food waste, but preventing excess food in the first place is better, says the EPA. paul mansfield photography/Getty Images hide caption

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paul mansfield photography/Getty Images

A Cosmopolitan magazine from November 1976. Since being rebranded as a women's magazine in 1965, it has become a mainstay of shopping aisles. Walmart said Tuesday it is removing Cosmo from its check-out lines. Suzanne Vlamis/AP hide caption

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Suzanne Vlamis/AP

Shoppers look at televisions at a Walmart during Black Friday sales in 2012 in Quincy, Mass. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images

In Push For Convenience, Walmart Wants To Help Shoppers Assemble Furniture, Mount TVs

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A woman pushing a stroller walks in front of a Rakuten Cafe store at a shopping district in Tokyo in 2014. Rakuten is Japan's largest e-commerce company. Yuya Shino/Reuters hide caption

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Yuya Shino/Reuters

On Wednesday Walmart began distributing a new solution to help customers dispose of leftover opioid prescriptions. But CDC says, just flush them down the toilet. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Walmart customers will be able to place an order by simply saying it out loud, using either the voice-activated speaker Google Home (left) or the Google Assistant app. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Anhydrous ammonia tanks in a newly planted wheat field. Walmart has promised big cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases. To meet that goal, though, the giant retailer may have to persuade farmers to use less fertilizer. It won't be easy. TheBusman/Getty Images hide caption

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TheBusman/Getty Images

Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms?

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Using his personal Twitter account, Trump has publicly thanked Walmart, among other companies, for their plans to increase investment and job creation. It's not yet clear how his tweets may affect company decision making. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some Firms Are Harnessing Trump's Tweets As A Marketing Strategy

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Starting this week, Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, says it will start piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its Florida stores. Courtesy of Wal-Mart hide caption

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Courtesy of Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart employee Adriana Cajuso takes payment from customer Yoalmi Matias at a store in Miami. By mid-2016, Wal-Mart says, customers will have the option of paying via their smartphones. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Wal-Mart employee Dayngel Fernandez stocks shelves in the produce department of a Miami store in February. Activists say the company's recent corporate policy changes don't address systemic labor and environmental problems. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jessey Drewsen, 25, lives near the H Street Wal-Mart in Washington, D.C. She says she doesn't like the store, but that she goes there for cheap supplies like pens. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

When Wal-Mart Comes To Town, What Does It Mean For Workers?

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A woman pushes a cart at a Costco store in Hackensack, N.J., in 2013. Big-box stores are effective delivery devices for fattening foods, economists argue in a new study. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Customers in Bentonville, Ark., where Walmart's corporate headquarters are located, turn out for holiday shopping on Thanksgiving. Gunnar Rathbun/Invision for Walmart/AP hide caption

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Gunnar Rathbun/Invision for Walmart/AP