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genetically engineered food

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

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Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

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Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture this week approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people. Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University hide caption

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Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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California farmer Erik Freese pulls down a healthy ear of corn that has been genetically engineered to produce its own pesticide. He says genetic engineering has helped him to farm more sustainably. Kathleen Masterson for NPR hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson for NPR

Two Sides Prepare For Vote On Genetically Modified Labeling In Calif.

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Scientists say the corn rootworm is growing resistant to Bt corn. Snbetor via Flickr hide caption

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Snbetor via Flickr