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organized crime

Lorena Villavicencio, sister of slain presidential candidate Fernando Villavicencio, embraces her husband outside the morgue where her brother's body is being held, in Quito, Ecuador, Thursday, Aug. 10, 2023. Carlos Noriega/AP hide caption

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Carlos Noriega/AP

Police officers secure evidence during a raid in Mainz, Germany, Wednesday, May 3, 2023. Police arrested suspects and raided homes early Wednesday across Germany in a massive effort to clamp down on members of an Italian organized crime syndicate. Sebastian Gollnow/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Gollnow/AP

What appears to be a makeshift greenhouse is seen behind a home where killings occurred in Aguanga, Calif. Several people were found fatally shot at the illegal marijuana growing operation. Elliot Spagat/AP hide caption

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Elliot Spagat/AP

A view of the Neapolitan suburb of Scampia, notorious for drug wars and battles between rival Camorra mafia factions. KONTROLAB/KONTROLAB/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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KONTROLAB/KONTROLAB/LightRocket via Getty

Amid Pandemic, Italian Prosecutors Warn That Mafia Groups Are Cementing Their Power

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In this 1993 FBI surveillance photo, Francis "Cadillac Frank" Salemme (left), Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi (second from left) and Frank Salemme Jr. (third from left) are seated at The Charles Hotel in Cambridge, Mass. FBI Surveillance Photo/AP hide caption

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FBI Surveillance Photo/AP

The trade in alcohol — illegal under Prohibition — led to the rise of organized crime and men such as Chicago gangster Al Capone, photographed here on Jan. 19, 1931. AP hide caption

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AP

Prohibition-Era Gang Violence Spurred Congress To Pass First Gun Law

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The 74-year-old daughter of the late Philadelphia crime boss Angelo Bruno still lives in the family home. There's "not a lot of encouragement" for people who want the property considered a piece of history. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP