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Packages of beef cuts are displayed at a Costco store on May 24 in Novato, Calif. The prices of meats have surged, and the White House is partly blaming the handful of meatpackers that control the industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

High Meat Prices Are Helping Fuel Inflation, And A Few Big Companies Are Being Blamed

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Digital food magazine Epicurious has announced it will stop publishing new recipes featuring beef in an effort to promote more sustainable cooking. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Nattapong Kaweeantawong, a third-generation owner of Wattana Panich, stirs the soup while his mother (left) helps serve and his wife (center) does other jobs at the restaurant. Nattapong or another family member must constantly stir the thick brew. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Soup's On! And On! Thai Beef Noodle Brew Has Been Simmering For 45 Years

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Cows graze on a grass field at a farm in Schaghticoke, N.Y. The grass-fed movement is based on the idea of regenerative agriculture. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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Joe Craine grabs a handful of late-winter Kansas prairie plants. Cattle need the nutrient-rich green grass to grow. Alex Smith/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Alex Smith/Harvest Public Media

Many upper caste Hindus consider the cow holy and have long rallied to ban beef eating. Critics of the government see the new animal cruelty rules as an effort to cater to these demands. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images

Jury selection began Wednesday in a defamation case over ABC News' 2012 reports on a South Dakota meat producer's lean, finely textured beef product, which critics dubbed "pink slime." Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

'Pink Slime' Trial Begins, But It's The News Media Under The Microscope

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Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

This peat soil in Sumatra, Indonesia, was formerly a forest. Clearing and draining such land releases huge amounts of greenhouse gases. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Epic, founded in Austin, Texas, makes organic meat bars filled with nuts and dried fruit. It's a rising star in the beef jerky market and was recently acquired by General Mills. Courtesy of Epic hide caption

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Courtesy of Epic

Crazy For Jerky: An Ancient Trail Food Finds New Fans

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An illustration of rinderpest in the Netherlands in the 18th century. Europeans once feared the cattle virus as much as they did the Black Death. Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons

Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

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Donnell Brown and another cowboy move a grouping of bulls from one pen to another on rib-eye ultrasound day in March at the R.A Brown Ranch. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

How Texas Ranchers Try To Clinch The Perfect Rib-Eye

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Cattle in holding pens at the Simplot feedlot located next to a slaughterhouse in Burbank, Washington on Dec. 26, 2013. Merck & Co Inc is testing lower dosages of its controversial cattle growth drug Zilmax drug in an effort to resume its sales to the $44 billion U.S. beef industry. Ross Courtney/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ross Courtney/Reuters/Landov

Black Angus cattle in pens outside the sale barn at 44 Farms, a 3,000-acre ranch in Cameron, Texas. The cattle were on display for bidders ahead of 44 Farms' fall auction in October. Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media

No 'Misteak': High Beef Prices A Boon For Drought-Weary Ranchers

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Researchers say there's plenty the beef industry can do to use less land and water and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions. But producers may need to charge a premium to make those changes. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Meat is displayed in a case at a grocery store in Miami in July. Pork and beef prices are up more than 11 percent since last summer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

High Prices Aren't Scaring Consumers Away From The Meat Counter

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Cattle rancher Sharon Harvat says she's worried about how the Brazilian beef imports will impact her business. Luke Runyon/NPR hide caption

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Luke Runyon/NPR

Ranchers Wary As U.S. Considers Brazilian Beef Imports

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