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Companies across the country say the pandemic is interfering with their ability to comply with laws that protect the public from pollution. The federal government is not keeping track of requests for regulatory leniency during the pandemic. DKAR Images/Tetra images /Getty Images hide caption

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DKAR Images/Tetra images /Getty Images

As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

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A stretch of the Mississippi River from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, La., that is crowded with chemical plants has been called "Cancer Alley" because of the health problems there. Giles Clarke/Getty Images hide caption

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Giles Clarke/Getty Images

UMCES chemist Michael Gonsior gathers water samples from Cocktown Creek in Maryland. Andrew Heyes/Courtesy of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science hide caption

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Andrew Heyes/Courtesy of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Trump's Budget Would Eliminate A Key Funder Of Research On Coastal Pollution

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Martin County relies on a water treatment plant that was built in 1968. Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource hide caption

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Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource

Kentucky Community Hopes Trump Infrastructure Plan Will Fix Water System

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Water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds in August 2015 that were built to contain heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident in Colorado. That site, and 47 others in southwest Colorado, were declared Superfund sites on Wednesday. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Health advise against eating any fish from the Lower Passaic because it may be contaminated with toxic chemicals. But Owaldo Avad says he's been catching and consuming fish like these from the river for eight years. Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC

New Jersey River Polluters Fund Toxic Fish Swap — But There's A Snag

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Crews perform dredging work along the upper Hudson River in Waterford, N.Y. General Electric's cleanup of PCBs discharged into the river decades ago will end this year. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

Once Feared, Now Celebrated, Hudson River Cleanup Nears Its End

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Tuesday's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to not review an ordinance passed by Alameda County, California, means that drug makers will now need to pay for collection and disposal of unused drugs in the county. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Coca-Cola cans on a production line at a bottling plant near New Delhi in 2013. The company decided in April 2015 not to build an $81 million bottling plant in southern India because local farmers said it might exhaust groundwater supplies. Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images

A fisherman collects water on a beach littered with trash at an ecological reserve south of Manila in 2013. Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov

8 Million Tons Of Plastic Clutter Our Seas

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Lynn Good has had many mentors throughout her career — but few of them were women. "So I'm generationally on the early part of the ascent of women into leadership roles," the Duke Energy president and CEO says. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Duke Energy CEO: 'I Don't Think Of Myself As A Powerful Woman'

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Perch exposed to the anxiety drug oxazepam were more daring and ate more quickly than fish that lived in drug-free water. Courtesy of Bent Christensen hide caption

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Courtesy of Bent Christensen

People look at homes and businesses destroyed during Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in the Rockaway section of Queens, N.Y. Spencer Plat/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Plat/Getty Images

Sandy Leaves Long List Of Health Threats

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