flu flu
Stories About

flu

A nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta last month. The disease is still "widespread" in many places, but slowing. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590231050/590384479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Ray/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the topic of a nuclear strike preparedness session, opting to focus on a widespread flu outbreak. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

As flu cases mount in California, the state's health department recommends vaccination for all people 6 months and older. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569379155/569983815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police tape blocks off a street where a 16-year-old was shot and killed and another 18-year-old was shot and wounded on the on April 25 in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua Lott/Getty Images

For Stopping A Pandemic Of Gun Violence, Let's Look To The Flu

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488148068/488150541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This year's flu vaccine protects against a few different virus strains, including the H1N1 seen here. The fuzzy outer layer is made of proteins that allow the virus to attach to human cells. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
NIAID/Flickr

Inside Each Flu Shot, Months Of Virus Tracking And Predictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/457403589/457565138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

toggle caption
C. S. Goldsmith/CDC

How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411469959/412177090" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Which flu vaccine should you get? That may depend on your age and your general health. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Flu Season Brings Stronger Vaccines And Revised Advice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/362031253/362086809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Adam Cole/NPR

Google's Flu Tracker Suffers From Sniffles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/289802934/289994230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Influenza covers it's shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

toggle caption
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases