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Mexican President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador waves to supporters during his national tour to thank those who voted for him in the July 1 elections, at the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Mexico City, in late September. Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico's New Populist President Takes Office On Saturday

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Sister Bertha Lopez Chaves applies anti-inflammatory eyedrops to a migrant at a stadium in Mexico City where the caravan is resting. Her order is one of roughly 50 groups giving aid to the migrants in the Mexican capital. "We're just trying to deal with their basic needs so they can continue on," she says. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Smith and Carlos stare downward during the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. AP hide caption

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AP

Those Raised Fists Still Resonate, 50 Years Later

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Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, center, stands Tuesday with Ana Ignacia Rodríguez Marquez, a former leader of the student movement of 1968, at a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre, at the Tres Culturas square in Mexico City. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

What's Changed Since Mexico's Bloody Crackdown On 1968 Student Protests?

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A large crack cuts through this Mexico City street. Half of the street is lower than the other half, one of many signs this metropolis is sinking. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Mexico City Keeps Sinking As Its Water Supply Wastes Away

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Mexico City Mayor-elect Claudia Sheinbaum cast her vote in the capital city on July 1. She and many women won posts in local governments and legislatures across the country. Bernardo Montoya/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernardo Montoya/AFP/Getty Images

Meet Mexico City's First Elected Female Mayor

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Police drive through Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, Mexico state. Brett Gundlock/Boreal Collective hide caption

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Brett Gundlock/Boreal Collective

Working The Night Shift For Mexico City's Bloody Crime Tabloids

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Rescue personnel work at the scene of Enrique Rebsamen School, which collapsed when an earthquake struck on Tuesday. Reports said workers were looking for a trapped little girl, but authorities now say it may be an adult. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Earthquake Hits Mexican State Of Morelos Hard

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Rescue workers search for earthquake survivors in Mexico City on Wednesday. Miguel Tovar/AP hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/AP

Mexico City Doomed By Its Geology To More Earthquakes

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The collapsed section of the Enrique Rebsamen school in Mexico City is surrounded by volunteers and rescue workers on Wednesday. A wing of the three-story building collapsed into a massive pancake of concrete slabs during Mexico's deadliest earthquake in years. Miguel Tovar/AP hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/AP

With the help of searchlights, rescuers, firefighters, policemen, soldiers and volunteers continue removing the rubble and debris from a flattened building late Monday in search of survivors after a powerful quake in Mexico City. More than 200 people were killed and dozens of buildings were collapsed by the earthquake. Mario Vazquez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Vazquez/AFP/Getty Images