health care quality health care quality

Amanda Gerety, a staff nurse at Boston Medical Center, checks monitors that track patients' vital signs. Fewer beeps means crisis warnings are easier to hear, she says. Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Knox/NPR

Silencing Many Hospital Alarms Leads To Better Health Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/265702152/266941686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Before you have get a new hip, you might want to check the government's list of best and worst hospitals for the operation. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Wilfred Mobley pushes through the emergency room patient at the University of Miami Hospital in 2012. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Here's an evidence-based test with no dangerous side effects. But some common orthopedic treatments don't work. Selim Ucar/CAM/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Selim Ucar/CAM/iStockphoto.com

We know you'd rather skip the fasting and bowel prep. But that's the way we've always done it. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Dr. Madhumathi Gunasekaran examines John Pike at the Northgate II clinic in Camden, N.J. Emma Lee hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Lee

In South Jersey, New Options For Primary Care Are Slow To Take Hold

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/176020285/176104549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors' use of CT head scans for hospitalized patients didn't change when the prices were revealed at the time an order was being made. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Wikimedia Commons

In a push to improve quality, Medicare will pay some hospitals more and others, including Boston's Massachusetts General, less. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Senne/AP

Medicare Starts To Reward Quality, Not Quantity, Of Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167728953/167771898" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Inattention to catheters used often in ICUs can lead to serious infections. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com