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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin) in the lab. Within days, the minibrains had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as groups of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

Tiny Lab-Grown 'Brains' Raise Big Ethical Questions

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Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University

A human embryo kept alive in the lab for 12 days begins to show signs of early development. The green cells seen here in the center would go on to form the body. This embryo is in the process of twinning, forming two small spheres out of one. Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University

Embryo Experiments Reveal Earliest Human Development, But Stir Ethical Debate

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Some ethicists and consumer watchdog groups worry that the newly revised federal rules governing medical research don't go far enough to protect the rights and privacy of patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Dana Neely/Getty Images
Alicia Watkins for NPR

Breaking Taboo, Swedish Scientist Seeks To Edit DNA Of Healthy Human Embryos

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

When Pregnant Women Need Medicine, They Encounter A Void

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Pablo Ross of the University of California, Davis, inserts human stem cells into a pig embryo as part of experiments to create chimeric embryos. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

NIH Plans To Lift Ban On Research Funds For Part-Human, Part-Animal Embryos

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A chalkboard "bucket list" stirred imaginations and got people talking at an Indianapolis festival designed to help make conversations about death easier. Jake Harper/WFYI hide caption

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Jake Harper/WFYI

Death Talk Is Cool At This Festival

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