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Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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Angela Saini, author of Superior: The Return of Race Science. Henrietta Garden hide caption

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Henrietta Garden

Is 'Race Science' Making A Comeback?

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CRISPR and other gene technology is exciting, but shouldn't be seen as a panacea for treating illness linked to genetic mutations, says science columnist and author Carl Zimmer. It's still early days for the clinical applications of research. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic Tests

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In her San Francisco home, NeDina Brocks-Capla has made a shrine filled with memories of son Kareem Jones, who died of sickle cell disease in 2013. Jenny Gold/KHN hide caption

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Jenny Gold/KHN

Sickle Cell Patients Endure Discrimination, Poor Care And Shortened Lives

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Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

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The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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The CRISPR enzyme (green and red) binds to a stretch of double-stranded DNA (purple and red), preparing to snip out the faulty part. Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley hide caption

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Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley

A CRISPR Way To Fix Faulty Genes

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Red blood cells are normally shaped like doughnuts, but sickle cells (purple) are flattened and clump together. NIH hide caption

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NIH

Nurse Corean McClinton, left, talks about pain management with Sherry Webb at the Sickle Cell Disease Center in the Truman Medical Center, in Kansas City, Mo., in 2007. Dick Whipple/Associated Press hide caption

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Dick Whipple/Associated Press