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A file photo from Jan. 15, 2011, shows Iran's heavy water nuclear facility near Arak. Iran plans to walk back modifications to a nuclear reactor at the site. Hamid Foroutan/AP hide caption

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Hamid Foroutan/AP

Iran Is About To Exceed Uranium Limits. Is The Nuclear Deal Dying?

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Atomic Energy Organization of Iran spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi, pictured at a July 2018 news conference in Tehran, said Monday: "We have quadrupled the rate of enrichment and even increased it more recently." Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

The safety director at Grand Canyon National Park says people may have been exposed to radiation from three buckets of uranium ore that sat for years in a museum collection building. Whether the amount of exposure was unsafe has not been determined. Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images

Many people who live in the Blue Gap-Tachee Chapter in northeastern Arizona remember when mining companies blasted uranium out of the Claim 28 site near their homes. Dust from mine explosions coated everything. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For Some Native Americans, Uranium Contamination Feels Like Discrimination

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President Trump and his supporters claim that in exchange for millions of dollars in donations to the Clinton Foundation, Hillary Clinton supported the 2010 sale of a mining company that gave Russia control of U.S. uranium supplies. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Navajo miners work at the Kerr-McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on May 7, 1953. AP hide caption

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AP

For The Navajo Nation, Uranium Mining's Deadly Legacy Lingers

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Workers stand inside the gold mine in Greenland's Nulanaq mountain in 2009. The Danish territory's underground wealth was at the forefront of elections in March. Now, Greenland faces another dilemma: whether to end a zero-tolerance policy on uranium extraction. Adrian Joachim/AP hide caption

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Adrian Joachim/AP

As Greenland Seeks Economic Development, Is Uranium The Way?

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