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Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children's Hospital, uses the experimental smartphone app and a paper funnel to check his daughter's ear. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Samsung executive DJ Koh holds up the new Galaxy Fold smartphone during an event on Feb. 20 in San Francisco. On Monday, the company announced it is delaying the device's launch. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

At the school that NPR's Jennifer Ludden's kids attend, they're phasing in a new policy to lock up mobile phones during the day. picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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picture alliance via Getty Images

Opinion: Please Take Away My Kids' Cellphones At School

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A crew hangs a Huawei advertising banner on the side of the Las Vegas Convention Center in January. Some senators want to ban it the world's third-largest seller of smartphones from the U.S. Steve Marcus/Reuters hide caption

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Steve Marcus/Reuters
Manu Fernandez/AP

President Trump Puts 'America First' On Hold To Save Chinese Jobs

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Liu Jin Yin, a 26-year-old farmer, has thousands of viewers a day watching his livestream diaries of life on the farm. He has nearly 200,000 subscribers and earns about $1,500 a month. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Livestreaming Country Life Is Turning Some Chinese Farmers Into Celebrities

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Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

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A driver uses his smartphone to pay the highway toll with Alipay, an app of Alibaba's online payment service, in the Chinese city of Hangzhou. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Cashless Trend Is Taking Hold With Mobile Payments

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This emergency alert jolted New Yorkers on Sept. 19 as police sought a suspect in connection with explosions in the New York City metropolitan area. Lacking a photo or a link to one, it raised concerns about racial profiling. AP hide caption

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AP

Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated in New York on July 28. All owners of the new smartphone have been urged to exchange the device after reports of phones' exploding or catching fire. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP