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An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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Liam Norris/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Oliver Byunggyu Woo/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

Managing Your News Intake In The Age Of Endless Phone Notifications

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Phone, Everlasting: What If Your Smartphone Never Got Old?

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Smartphone assistants like Siri will give you a national help line to call when you bring up suicide. But they have trouble recognizing other things, like rape or physical abuse. Michael Nagle/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Getty Images

A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Under Pressure, Google Promises To Update Android Security Regularly

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A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

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Google's upcoming "now on tap" feature will let smartphone users ask a question within an app like Spotify. Google Inside Search hide caption

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Google Inside Search

How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

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