Ethiopia Ethiopia

Ethiopia's Government Faces Its Biggest Political Crisis Since Coming To Power In 1991

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A young white rhino, drugged and blindfolded, is about to be released into the Okavango Delta in Botswana. It was relocated from South Africa to protect it from poachers. Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo hide caption

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Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo

Amina Ahmed at home in Oromo, Ethiopia. Before having cataracts removed from both her eyes, she had been blind for four years. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

A 4-Minute Surgery That Can Give Sight To The Blind

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said the goal of the prisoner release and prison shutdown is to "foster national reconciliation." Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

Ethiopia Says It Will Free All Of Its Political Prisoners

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The modest proposal: Keep your daughter in school for two years and don't marry her off and you'll get a goat or two chickens. The animals pictured above live in Ethiopia, where the strategy to stop child marriage was tested. David Cayless/Getty Images hide caption

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David Cayless/Getty Images

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Supporters of Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus rally for his candidacy for World Health Organization director-general in Geneva on May 23. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

World Health Organization Elects First Director-General From Africa

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Police officers secure the perimeter at the scene of a garbage landslide, as excavators aid rescue efforts on the outskirts of Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Elias Meseret/AP hide caption

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Elias Meseret/AP

In a scene from Sunday, Oct. 2, festival-goers chant slogans against the government during a march in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. A week of violence prompted the country to declare a state of emergency. AP hide caption

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AP

Protesters chant slogans at a demonstration in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, on Aug. 6. Demonstrations took place last weekend across the country, and Amnesty International says dozens of peaceful protesters were shot dead. Tiksa Negeri/Reuters hide caption

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Tiksa Negeri/Reuters

Ethiopia Grapples With The Aftermath Of A Deadly Weekend

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Henok launches off a homemade quarterpipe ramp at a parking lot. Sean Stromsoe hide caption

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Sean Stromsoe

How Do You Say 'Gnarly' In Amharic? Ethiopia Gets Its First Skate Park

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (left), walks alongside President Obama during the U.S. president's visit to the African nation last July. Critics say Ethiopia has cracked down hard on the opposition, but makes modest gestures to give the impression it tolerates some dissent. SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

Ethiopia Stifles Dissent, While Giving Impression Of Tolerance, Critics Say

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At a 2015 press conference with President Obama in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn asked the foreign press corps to "help our journalists to increase their capacity." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country

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