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Ethiopia

Jawar Mohammed, 32, created the Oromia Media Network and used it to bludgeon one of the most brutal regimes on the African continent. Maheder Haileselassie Tadese/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maheder Haileselassie Tadese/AFP/Getty Images

How An Exiled Activist In Minnesota Helped Spur Big Political Changes In Ethiopia

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Mezgebo, 47, found only a pile of rocks when he returned to his family home. But he began work anyway, winnowing his wheat within view of the Eritrean border. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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'Peace Is Everything': Ethiopia And Eritrea Embrace Open Border After Long Conflict

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The faithful enter Ethiopia's Holy Trinity Cathedral. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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'It Has Been A Dream': Ethiopians Are Adjusting To Rapid Democratic Changes

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Meaza Ashenafi is Ethiopia's first female Supreme Court chief, and one of several women appointed to senior government positions by its new reformist Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Sahle-Work Zewde walks with Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed after being appointed Ethiopia's first female president at the country's parliament in Addis Ababa on Thursday. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The border between Ethiopia and Eritrea reopened on Tuesday. Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (left) and Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki (right) celebrated the reopening of the Embassy of Eritrea in Addis Ababa in July. Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images

Passengers pose for a selfie picture inside an Ethiopian Airlines plane that departed from Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and flew to Eritrea's capital, Asmara, on Wednesday. It was the first commercial flight between the two African countries in two decades. Maheder Haileselassie Tadese/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maheder Haileselassie Tadese/AFP/Getty Images

A public telephone booth in Asmara, Eritrea. Ethiopians and Eritreans are calling each other this week as phone lines that had been dormant for decades came to life. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

'I Am Calling Randomly To Say Hi': Eritreans, Ethiopians Phone Each Other Amid Thaw

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, background, is welcomed by Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki as he disembarks a plane on Sunday in Asmara, Eritrea. ERITV/AP hide caption

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Thousands of Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's supporters gathered to watch him speak at a rally Saturday in Addis Ababa. But a blast interrupted the event, leaving at least one person dead and dozens more with injuries. Yonas Tadesse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yonas Tadesse/AFP/Getty Images

"The Departure" from Aïda Muluneh's "The World is 9" collection. The title comes from a saying of Muluneh's grandmother — meaning that the world will never be a perfect 10. Aïda Muluneh hide caption

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Aïda Muluneh

A woman walks with orphans at an Addis Ababa orphanage in 2013. The number of Ethiopian children adopted by Americans fell from 2,511 in 2010 to 133 in 2016, according to the State Department. Ethiopia's parliament banned all foreign adoption in January. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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In Ethiopia, A New Ban On Foreign Adoptions Is About National Pride

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Ethiopian teams Adama City and Welwalo Adigrat University play in a soccer match. Stadiums have become battlefields and teams have become a proxy for the political divisions in the country. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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In Ethiopia, Soccer Stadiums Have Become Political Battlefields

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Ethiopia's Government Faces Its Biggest Political Crisis Since Coming To Power In 1991

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Boats sail on the Nile River in Cairo, Egypt, last October. Tensions between Egypt and upstream Nile basin countries, Sudan and Ethiopia, have flared up again over the construction and effects of a massive dam being built by Ethiopia on the Nile River. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

A young white rhino, drugged and blindfolded, is about to be released into the Okavango Delta in Botswana. It was relocated from South Africa to protect it from poachers. Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo hide caption

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Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo

Amina Ahmed at home in Oromo, Ethiopia. Before having cataracts removed from both her eyes, she had been blind for four years. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

A 4-Minute Surgery That Can Give Sight To The Blind

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said the goal of the prisoner release and prison shutdown is to "foster national reconciliation." Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopia Says It Will Free All Of Its Political Prisoners

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The modest proposal: Keep your daughter in school for two years and don't marry her off and you'll get a goat or two chickens. The animals pictured above live in Ethiopia, where the strategy to stop child marriage was tested. David Cayless/Getty Images hide caption

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David Cayless/Getty Images

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller