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Margarita Ahuanari, left, and Karina Ahuanari look at posters of their mother. The images were placed where they think she was buried at the mass grave that was later renamed the COVID-19 Cemetery in Iquitos. Angela Ponce for NPR hide caption

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Angela Ponce for NPR

A mass COVID grave in Peru has left families bereft — and fighting for reburial

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Zhang Hai stands on a bridge where he took his father out for a walk only about four months earlier. His father died of the novel coronavirus on Feb. 1. "The scenery is still here, but the person is gone," he sighs. He says he frequently comes to this park "looking for memories." Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR

The New Rules For Mourners In Wuhan Have Angered Many Residents

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On April 3, Iraqi volunteers in full hazmat gear prayed over the coffin of a 50-year-old who died of COVID-19. She was buried at a cemetery specifically opened for such deaths, some 12 miles from the holy city of Najaf. Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Is Changing The Rituals Of Death For Many Religions

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A tour group visits the tomb of President James K. Polk and his wife Sarah Childress Polk on the grounds of the Tennessee State Capitol. Chas Sisk/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Chas Sisk/Nashville Public Radio

Finding A Place For President Polk's Body To Truly Rest In Peace

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An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

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Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

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Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris is considered the first modern community of the dead. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Michel Euler/AP

Historian Traces Our Relationship With The Dead

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Columbia University's DeathLab comes up with new ideas for honoring and storing the dead — like Constellation Park, the design of which is shown here. Courtesy of Latent Productions and DeathLab hide caption

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Courtesy of Latent Productions and DeathLab