soda tax soda tax

Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck's cooler in 2014 in San Francisco. The city is one of several in California that have a soda tax on the ballot this November. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trick Or Treat? Critics Blast Big Soda's Efforts To Fend Off Taxes

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Diet Coke for sale in a Chinese supermarket. A new World Health Organization report recommends that nations adopt fiscal policies, including taxes, that raise the retail price of sugary drinks to fend off obesity and diabetes — and the health care costs that go with them. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

Berkeley, Calif., passed the nation's first soda tax in 2014. According to a new study, the tax has succeeded in cutting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there's uncertainty about whether the effect will be permanent. Robert Galbraith/Reuters hide caption

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Robert Galbraith/Reuters

Berkeley's Soda Tax Appears To Cut Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

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Khadija Sabir of Lovie Lee's Stars of Tomorrow preschool in Philadelphia attends a soda tax rally with three of her charges. The proposed tax promises to pay for universal pre-K, parks and recreation centers. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Philly Wants To Tax Soda To Raise Money For Schools

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

Beginning April 1, all sugary beverages and food of "minimal-to-no nutritional value" sold on the Navajo reservation will incur an additional 2-cent tax. April Sorrow/Flickr hide caption

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April Sorrow/Flickr

Berkeley's efforts to pass a penny-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks faced opposition with deep pockets — but it also got sizable cash infusions from some big-name donors. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The majority of voters in San Francisco and Berkeley, Calif., voted in favor of a soda tax, but the measure didn't gain the required two-thirds majority required in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Proponents of the taxes say that if the measures pass, the money would be directed, in San Francisco, toward childhood nutrition and recreation and, in Berkeley, into the city's general fund. Joel Saget /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget /AFP/Getty Images

Soda-Makers Try To Take Fizz Out Of Bay Area Tax Campaigns

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

A Coca-Cola mural in Vicksburg, Miss., where the soda was first bottled in 1894. Mississippi's governor is expected to sign a bill that would prevent the regulation of soda portion sizes by counties or towns. pratt/via Flickr hide caption

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pratt/via Flickr

Soda Wars Backlash: Mississippi Passes 'Anti-Bloomberg' Bill

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A sign protesting a beverage tax in Richmond, Calif. The U.S. soft drink industry has fought proposals that would put a tax on sugar sweetened beverages like sodas and energy drinks. Braden Reddall/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Braden Reddall/Reuters /Landov

Researchers say that if the price of soda gets higher, people will drink less of it, which will lead to fewer deaths. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images