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emotions

To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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In the division of household tasks, one study shows that washing dishes is the category with the biggest discrepancy between men and women. Alex Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wilson/Getty Images

Rogers hand feeds June, a 300-plus-pound pregnant black bear. Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

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Derek Montgomery for NPR

Invisibilia: Should Wild Bears Be Feared Or Befriended?

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A psychologist argues people experience emotions differently. For instance, fear might make some people cry while for others, it could elicit laughter. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR
Marina Muun for NPR

Invisibilia: A Man Finds An Explosive Emotion Locked In A Word

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The myth that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

When It Comes To Politics and 'Fake News,' Facts Aren't Enough

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Tommy Chreene with his horse, Lady, at home in Meaux, La. Chreene spent 26 years working on offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. While working on the Ursa project, he was part of a program designed to get the workers to open up emotionally with one another. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Emotion seemed to fuel plenty of sighs by Humphrey Bogart's character Rick (right) in the 1942 film classic Casablanca, and even Rick's good friend Sam, played by actor Dooley Wilson, couldn't console him. Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Getty Images

Joy (left, voiced by Amy Poehler) and Sadness (voiced by Phyllis Smith) catch a ride on the Train of Thought in Pixar's Inside Out. The movie opens in theaters nationwide June 19. Disney/Pixar hide caption

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Disney/Pixar

Science Of Sadness And Joy: 'Inside Out' Gets Childhood Emotions Right

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A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches. Dan Perez/Flickr hide caption

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Dan Perez/Flickr

Scientists Probe Puppy Love

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