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Boko Haram

Ya Kaka, left, and Hauwa, right, who were captured by Boko Haram in 2014, pose with Statue of Liberty impersonators in Times Square. Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed

A mural showing a teacher leading a young girl to school is riddled with bullet holes after an attack by Boko Haram militants last month. They attacked the Dapchi Government Girls Science and Technology College in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones

In Nigeria, Distraught Parents Demand Answers After Boko Haram Kidnaps 110 Girls

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Soldiers drive past a sign leading to the Government Girls Science and Technical College staff quarters in Dapchi, Nigeria, on Thursday. Scores of schoolgirls have been reported missing in Monday's suspected Boko Haram attack. AMINU ABUBAKAR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AMINU ABUBAKAR/AFP/Getty Images

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Other Press

Patience Ibrahim Thought No One Would Care About Her Story As A Boko Haram Captive

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Zainabu Hamayaji went to extreme lengths to protect her family from being abducted by Boko Haram. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

To Save Her Children, She Pretended To Be Crazy

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Zannah Mustapha and the students of the Future Prowess School he founded for children caught up in the Boko Haram conflict. This week he won a U.N. prize for his efforts. Rahima Gambo/UNHCR hide caption

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Rahima Gambo/UNHCR

Salamatu Umar, who was forced to marry a Boko Haram fighter, holds son Usman Abubakar. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Lament Of The Boko Haram 'Brides'

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Modu Churi, who fled his village to escape the militant Boko Haram group last year, now earns a living by charging cellphones for displaced persons in northeastern Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

How To Succeed In Business After Fleeing For Your Life

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This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks and now lives in a rehabilitation center. He is probably around 6 years old but doesn't know for sure. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

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Uwani Musa Dure, 25, is one of the scores of mostly women and children who fled Gwoza and have recently returned. She now lives at a settlement for the displaced — and is searching for family members abducted by Boko Haram. Fati Abubakar/UNICEF hide caption

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Fati Abubakar/UNICEF

What It's Like To Come Home After Fleeing From Boko Haram

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Aweofeso Adebola (in white shirt) and Ifeoluwa Ayomide (in cap) pose with some of their students. Zachariah Ibrahim, who dreams of being a pilot, stands behind the girl in the green hijab. Fatima Alidarunge, who wants to be a soldier to fight Boko Haram, is in the blue headgear. Linus Unah for NPR hide caption

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Linus Unah for NPR

Five-year-old Fatima shows off her Sallah gift in a camp for those internally displaced by the ongoing violence in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

In Northeast Nigeria, Displaced Families Celebrate Ramadan's End In Style

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The recently released Chibok girls reunited with their families amidst laughter and tears in the Nigerian capital of Abuja. Still, 113 girls are being held by Boko Haram militants. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images