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Boko Haram

Sa'a, a pseudonym she uses for her safety, poses for a photo after an interview with NPR. She was one of more than 250 girls kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram in 2014. Sa'a, 20, escaped by jumping off a moving truck. She began studying at a college in the U.S. in January. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

From Boko Haram Captive To U.S. College Student

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The husbands ran when Boko Haram took over the Nigerian village of Gwoza. Fati, 22, was one of the wives left behind. After five months, she and other women escaped and now live in a camp for displaced people. Because of the stigma of being a Boko Haram abductee, she says she sometimes is "verbally abused" by other residents. But she's found one good friend. International Alert/ UNICEF hide caption

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International Alert/ UNICEF

Members of the Bring Back Our Girls group urging the release of the Chibok schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram militants march to meet with Nigeria's president in Abuja in July 2015. Philip Ojisua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Ojisua/AFP/Getty Images

Young Nigerians draw an attack scene during a therapy program at a refugee camp in Chad for people displaced by the violent conflict with Boko Haram. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

Boko Haram Abductees Face Tough Return

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Nigeria's former national security adviser Sambo Dasuki (center) arrives at the Federal High Court in Abuja on Dec. 14 for a hearing on charges of possessing weapons illegally. Olamikan Gbemiga /AP hide caption

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Olamikan Gbemiga /AP

Did Corruption In Nigeria Hamper Its Fight Against Boko Haram?

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Cameroonian soldiers stand guard at a lookout post on Feb. 25 as they take part in operations against the Islamist extremist group Boko Haram in northern Cameroon, near the border with Nigeria. Edwin Kindzeka Moki/AP hide caption

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Edwin Kindzeka Moki/AP

People gather to look at a burnt car following a bomb explosion that rocked a roundabout near the crowded Monday Market in Maiduguri, Nigeria, on July 1, 2014. The city has been repeatedly hit by Boko Haram terrorists. A recent report found that in 2014, the group was responsible for more known deaths from terrorism than any other organization. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Lami Musa, 27, cradles her 5-day-old baby girl at a refugee camp clinic. One of the women rescued from Boko Haram, she says her husband was killed before she was abducted by Islamist extremists. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Campaigners marched Monday in Nigeria's capital of Abuja during a silent protest to raise awareness about girls and boys abducted by Boko Haram. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Hundreds Of Nigerian Girls Still Missing A Year After Kidnapping

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No one knows how many children have been affected by the spread of Boko Haram across Nigeria and neighboring countries. This photo shows the school uniforms of the girls kidnapped from a school a year ago. Glenna Gordon/Glenna Gordon for NPR hide caption

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Glenna Gordon/Glenna Gordon for NPR