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depression

Sara Wong for NPR

Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

We Just 'Fell Back' An Hour. Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

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Houses lie at the base of Colorado National Monument. The school district in Grand Junction knows it could take years to see whether their efforts towards suicide prevention have worked. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

How One Colorado Town Is Tackling Suicide Prevention — Starting With The Kids

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A New Prescription For Depression: Join A Team And Get Sweaty

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Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source
Veronica Grech/Getty Images

Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

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Girard Children's Community Garden in Washington, D.C. was created on a vacant lot and is now a thriving community space for neighborhood kids, many of whom are from low-income communities of color. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities

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Helping those who are suffering know they are not alone is one step toward suicide prevention, researchers say. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Getty Images

U.S. Suicide Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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Francesco Zorzi for NPR

The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

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An average of 13,776 inmates in 45 California counties were on psychotropic medications in 2016-2017, a recent report found. That is up from 10,999 five years ago. erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images hide caption

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erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images

Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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