depression depression

Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source
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Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

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Girard Children's Community Garden in Washington, D.C. was created on a vacant lot and is now a thriving community space for neighborhood kids, many of whom are from low-income communities of color. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Replacing Vacant Lots With Green Spaces Can Ease Depression In Urban Communities

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Helping those who are suffering know they are not alone is one step toward suicide prevention, researchers say. Veronica Grech/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Suicide Rates Are Rising Faster Among Women Than Men

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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Francesco Zorzi for NPR

The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

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An average of 13,776 inmates in 45 California counties were on psychotropic medications in 2016-2017, a recent report found. That is up from 10,999 five years ago. erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images hide caption

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erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images

Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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It's easy to mistake adolescent depression for something else, child psychiatrists say; the signs can include misbehavior, eating problems or sleep trouble. Johner Bildbyra/Getty Images hide caption

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Pediatricians Call For Universal Depression Screening For Teens

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Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Light Therapy Might Help People With Bipolar Depression

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