segregation segregation

A welcome sign at the city limit of Gardendale, Ala. The city is trying to break away from the larger Jefferson County School System to form its own system. Mark Almond/WBHM hide caption

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Mark Almond/WBHM

This Mostly White City Wants To Leave Its Mostly Black School District

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Margaret Feldman helps students (from left) Al Nagib Conteh, 17, and Devin Butler, 18, as they work through their FAFSA applications. Conteh's father, Ahmed Conteh (back), is there to help his son through some of the harder questions. Mayra Linares/NPR hide caption

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Mayra Linares/NPR

Hey Students, Applying For College Aid Is Easier! (But Still Hard)

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Oak Hill Middle School students say goodbye to METCO students heading back to Boston on the bus. Kieran Kesner for NPR hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for NPR

Why Busing Didn't End School Segregation

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Superintendent Jay Badams leads a coalition of students, parents, educators and community members at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa., urging lawmakers to alter policies that have left Erie's public schools on the brink of insolvency. Kevin McCorry/WHYY hide caption

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Kevin McCorry/WHYY

This District May Close All Of Its High Schools; It's About Much More Than Money

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Frank Sinatra was known as a member of the "Rat Pack," along with Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop. AP hide caption

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AP

'One More' For Sinatra, Who Took A Stand In Gary, Indiana

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, (left) poses with his uncle, Philip Lee, and father Peter Lee (seated) at the younger Peter Lee's home in Pasadena, Calif., in 2013. Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images

Meet The California Family That Has Made Health Policy Its Business

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Helena Hicks has remained active in Baltimore through eras of desegregation and the drug trade. Now she gives back to her childhood neighborhood, the same one where Freddie Gray lived. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

A Baltimore Civil Rights Icon Is Still Pushing To Help City's Young

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A helicopter flies over a section of Baltimore affected by riots. Richard Rothstein writes that recent unrest in Baltimore is the legacy of a century of federal, state and local policies designed to "quarantine Baltimore's black population in isolated slums." Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

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George Stinney Jr. appears in an undated police booking photo provided by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. A South Carolina judge vacated the conviction of the 14-year-old, who was executed in 1944, saying he didn't receive a fair trial. Landov hide caption

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Landov

S.C. Judge Says 1944 Execution Of 14-Year-Old Boy Was Wrong

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Landrieu's Loss Flips Lingering Holdout Of Democrats' 'Solid South'

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