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Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Jozef Jason, 7, reads a book to Ryan Griffin at the Fuller Cut in Ypsilanti, Mich., as part of the barbershop's literacy program. Keith Jason/Courtesy of Keith Jason hide caption

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Keith Jason/Courtesy of Keith Jason

Checking Back In On The Barber Who Encourages Kids To Read

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Sure, keeping a teenager's thoughts corralled may seem like lion taming. But that impulsivity may help them learn, too. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

Earlier studies have found that children who grow up in houses with a TV on many hours a day learn fewer words than children in households with less TV time. Heleen Sitter/Getty Images hide caption

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Heleen Sitter/Getty Images

New Words With Quieter Background Chatter

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Studying? Take A Break And Embrace Your Distractions

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If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

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Video games with lots of action might be useful for helping people with dyslexia train the brain's attention system. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Cellist Matt Haimovitz made it big in the classical music scene as a little kid. Stephanie Mackinnon hide caption

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Stephanie Mackinnon

Studying The Science Behind Child Prodigies

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Sure, it's cute. But that voice! Lennart Tange/flickr hide caption

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Lennart Tange/flickr

Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too

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